Can stereotypes ever be good? – Sheila Marie Orfano and Densho

Explore the model minority stereotype, and discover how it became a label for Asian Americans and is used to enforce racial hierarchies.

In 2007, researchers surveyed 180 teachers to understand if they held stereotypes about their students. The most commonly held opinion was that Asian students were significantly more industrious, intelligent, and gentle. This might seem like a good thing, but treating this stereotype as reality can cause a surprising amount of harm. Sheila Marie Orfano and Densho dig into the model minority myth.

Lesson by Sheila Marie Orfano and Densho, directed by Léon Moh-Cah.

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How Can We Use Plastics in a Smart Way? | Melanie Ecker | TEDxUNT

Melanie Ecker, assistant professor and director of the Ecker Lab: Smart Polymers for Biomedical Applications in UNT’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, argues that some plastics are smart — like shape-shifting polymers that can remember their original shape and be used in applications such as artificial muscles. “We need to combine polymers in smart ways,” she says. “By doing so, we can help many patients and even save lives.” Dr. Melanie Ecker is an assistant professor and
director of the Ecker Lab: Smart Polymers for
Biomedical Applications in UNT’s Department of
Biomedical Engineering, where her research interests
include polymer science and biomedical engineering.
She hopes the combination of both fields will lead
to the development of next-generation biomedical
devices based on polymeric biomaterials, such as
conformal and biocompatible neural devices, to study
the electrophysiology of the enteric nervous system.
Dr. Ecker has published 27 peer-reviewed publications
with more than 480 citations, holds two patents, and
has delivered numerous presentations at national
and international conferences. In the Ecker Lab, she
currently mentors a group of six undergraduate
and six graduate students from diverse and
multidisciplinary backgrounds, and is the faculty
advisor for the Biomedical Engineering Society
student organization. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Why the pope dresses like that

The hidden meaning behind Pope Francis’s clothes.

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The pope is one of the most recognizable figures in the world, in large part because of the clothes he wears: all white, ornate ponchos, various hats. But all popes don’t actually dress alike. There are different articles of clothing that correspond to different events and times of year, and there is a certain amount of personal choice involved.

Pope Francis has made waves across the Catholic Church with his relatively progressive, modern takes on church doctrine and tradition, and his clothing is a visual shorthand for those policies.

To learn more about the history of papal clothing, see The Church Visible: the ceremonial life and protocol of the Roman Catholic Church by James-Charles Noonan https://archive.org/details/churchvisiblecer0000noon

For a deep dive about Pope Francis’s visit to Lampedusa, check out Making Immigrants Visible in Lampedusa: Pope Francis, Migration, and the State by Tina Catania https://www.academia.edu/18158629/Making_Immigrants_Visible_in_Lampedusa_Pope_Francis_Migration_and_the_State

And to look at a whole range of Catholic and Catholic-inspired clothing, see the catalog for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2018 exhibit Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2018/heavenly-bodies

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The Past, Present, and Future of Human Evolution | Compilation

Humanity has changed a lot since the days of our ancestral species, and we have continued evolution to look forward to as well.

Hosted by: Hank Green

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Abilities Evolution Took From Us: https://youtu.be/jRuy7tBfAgE
The Future of Human Evolution: https://youtu.be/tNjsVTQ7Q3c

What can BDSM teach us about affirmative consent? | Candace Liger | TEDxGreensboro

Consent is more than “no means no” and involves positive mutual decisions about acceptable and unacceptable activities. Candace Liger is the founder of The Center For Body
Autonomy, which promotes safe, healthy, and inclusive
environments for bodies to thrive. They are a nationally
recognized consent educator, fitness trainer, award-winning
performance poet, advocate, and kink coach. Her primary
campaign #ConsentConscious advocates for trauma-informed,
pleasure-centric consent. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Paying It Forward | David Hoe | TEDxYouth@NgeeAnnPolytechnic

In his PSLE (Primary School Leaving Examination), David Hoe scored 110 and went into the Normal (Technical) stream. He grew up in challenging family circumstances and fell into bad company, but soon turned over a new leaf at the right time to beat overwhelming odds to be one of the top scorers in the GCE N-Levels.

David, who was once considered a “failure” in terms of societal norms, went on to top his cohort despite challenging circumstances. Now, his academic rags-to-riches story stands out as a heartland rebel student who beat the odds to become a teacher. In his PSLE (Primary School Leaving Examination), David Hoe scored 110 and went into the Normal (Technical) stream. He grew up in challenging family circumstances and fell into bad company, but soon turned over a new leaf at the right time to beat overwhelming odds to be one of the top scorers in the GCE N-Levels.

David, who was once considered a “failure” in terms of societal norms, went on to top his cohort despite challenging circumstances. Now, his academic rags-to-riches story stands out as a heartland rebel student who beat the odds to become a teacher. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

This tiny rolling robot self-assembles with heat! #shorts #science #robotics #technology

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Sources:
https://www.cell.com/matter/fulltext/S2590-2385(21)00408-2?utm_source=EA
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/800260
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/800259
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/800258

13 Surprising Facts About Old Hollywood

The golden age of film defined Hollywood for more than a generation. And while Old Hollywood may evoke romantic images of soft-focus stars, the era was also marked by a certain “make it up as you go” spirit that could lead to folly (or worse).

The surprising facts about Old Hollywood in this episode of the List Show run the gamut, from the amusing to the appalling. You’ll learn what “The Black Box” was and why a film crew dumped asbestos on Judy Garland.

In case you forgot, The List Show is a trivia-tastic, fact-filled show for curious people. Subscribe here for new Mental Floss episodes every Wednesday: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpZ5qUqpW4hW4zdfuBxMSJA?sub_confirmation=1

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What is melatonin — and should you take it to fall asleep? | Sleeping with Science

Melatonin is the hormone that tells our brains and bodies it’s time to sleep. But if you think melatonin supplements will significantly improve your ability to fall asleep and stay asleep, you may have been misled. Sleep scientist Matt Walker shares how this “hormone of darkness” really works.

Sleep — we spend one-third of our lives doing it, but what exactly do we get out of it? And how can we do it better? In this TED series, sleep scientist Matt Walker uncovers the facts and secrets behind our nightly slumber. (Made possible with the support of Oura) Check out more episodes on TED.com: https://go.ted.com/sleepingwithscience

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The Mystery of Snowflakes

Dr Ken Libbrecht is the world expert on snowflakes, designer of custom snowflakes, snowflake consultant for the movie Frozen – his photos appear on postage stamps all over the world. This video is sponsored by Brilliant. The first 200 people to sign up via https://brilliant.org/veritasium get 20% off a yearly subscription.

Thanks to Dr Ken Libbrecht for showing us how to grow designer snowflakes. Obviously, this video would not have been possible without his help and his expertise. His website is full of information about snowflakes http://snowcrystals.com. His new book is also available to purchase from here — https://ve42.co/SnowCrystalsBook

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Sinclair Software & Manuals – Computerphile

The Spectrum kick started an entire generation of computer coders. Dr Steve Vickers was involved in developing software for both the ZX81 and Spectrum, he even wrote the manuals!

EXTRA BITS – Dr Vickers on The Jupiter Ace : https://youtu.be/cbAOqHEWSWg

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Tricky test question – maximum probability of a red ball

Thanks to Amish for the suggestion! This is a tricky one from India’s challenging JEE Mains test. Can you figure it out?

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Is Meat Really that Bad?

The first 1,000 people to use this link will get a 1 month free trial of Skillshare:
https://skl.sh/kurzgesagtinanutshell11211

Sources & further reading:
https://sites.google.com/view/sources-climate-meat/

Food is arguably the best thing about being alive. No other bodily pleasure is enjoyed multiple times every day and never gets old. It is an expression of culture, our parents’ love and a means of celebration or comfort. That’s why it hits a special nerve when we are told we should change what and how we eat to fight rapid climate change. One of the most delicious foods, meat, gets the worst press. It doesn’t help that the topic is really hard to properly research yourself and debates get emotional quickly. But clearly science can give us an answer!

The reality is, well, it’s complicated. Let’s take a look at three climate arguments against meat that are used a lot and see what happens.

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The life cycle of a pair of jeans – Madhavi Venkatesan

Trace the life cycle of a pair of denim jeans, and discover the labor and environmental costs of this fashion staple.

The first pairs of jeans were designed for durability; denim was constructed as a sturdy weave worn by sailors and miners. But over the course of the 20th century, as the demand for jeans has gone up, their durability has gone down. Today, most pairs last no longer than a year. And each new pair you buy has a much higher cost than you might think. Madhavi Venkatesan traces the life cycle of jeans.

Lesson by Madhavi Venkatesan, directed by Sofia Pashaei.

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Innovative virtuoso guitar | Vicki Genfan | TEDxGreensboro

A master of tuning and teaching to expand the range of the guitar Vicki Genfan is a virtuoso guitarist, singer and
composer drawing from folk, jazz, pop, soul and
world music. With a mastery of the acoustic guitar
and playing her unique percussive technique of
‘slap-tap’ guitar and over 30 different guitar tunings,
she takes the listener on an unforgettable journey. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Is it really that bad to marry my cousin? | Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi

There are things we accept as obvious truths that aren’t necessarily backed up by data. A primary example: cousin marriage being taboo. In this episode, data journalist Mona Chalabi looks at the numbers behind our family trees to reveal that cousin marriage is much more common and much less “ick” than you might think. Want to hear more from Mona? Check out her podcast Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi, from the TED Audio Collective.

Want to hear more from Mona? Follow Am I Normal? on Apple Podcasts: https://link.chtbl.com/AINyta

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What Happens When You Remove Your Body Hair?

We’re all pretty invested in what our body hair looks like. But why exactly do we have body hair in the first place, and what happens when we remove it?
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On average, we’re covered in about 5 million hair follicles. That’s around the same number as other non-human primates, ours just isn’t as visible because most of it is the short, soft ‘peach fuzz’ called ‘vellus hair’. Our fuzz has a job: it helps us regulate our temperature by helping our sweat evaporate.

When we’re cold, miniscule muscles in our skin contract around those hairs and make them stand on end—that’s what goosebumps are! Now, the longer, coarser, more distinctive hair on our head, face, legs, and groin is ‘terminal hair’. Terminal hair is what we tend to be more preoccupied with. It’s found in specific places for a reason. Your eyelashes and eyebrows keep sweat and debris out of your eyes (with the added bonus of helping us express ourselves and recognize each other).

Terminal hair on the head, legs, chest, and other large surfaces also regulates our temperature, and may protect our skin from UV damage and prickly, pokey stuff in our environment. But these are just our best guesses for WHY we have body hair in the places we do.. For evolutionary biology, body hair is actually still something of an enigma.

#bodyhair #bodylanguage #wellness #seeker

Read More:
History of Hair Removal
https://www.si.edu/spotlight/health-hygiene-and-beauty/hair-removal
Personal care products which remove unwanted hair from the face and body were developed to address interwoven concerns about hygiene and personal appearance. Removing body hair helped stave off infestations of lice and other parasites, especially for those who lived in close quarters and who had limited access to bathing. Because hair traps perspiration, it can also become a breeding ground for bacteria and odors. For these reasons, by the early 1900s being “clean-shaven” had become associated with basic hygiene.

7 WAYS TO REMOVE UNWANTED HAIR
https://www.aad.org/public/everyday-care/skin-care-basics/hair/remove-unwanted-hair
When it comes to removing unwanted hair, you have options. With so much misinformation available about these options, it can be difficult to know which one(s) is best for you. To help you make an informed decision, here are the basic facts that dermatologists share with their patients about 7 popular ways to remove unwanted hair.

What is the purpose of pubic hair? https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/why-do-we-have-pubic-hair
Pubic hair serves several purposes, including disease prevention and friction reduction.Whether a person chooses to remove none, all, or some of their pubic hair is a personal choice. Although the media, sexual partners, and societal “norms” can sometimes influence this choice, it should be a personal one.
___________________
Body Language is Seeker’s latest series diving into the world of female health, and their bodies. For so long, the medical field only used the male body to conduct research, creating a gap in terms of what we currently know about female bodies. In this series, we’ll be talking to experts to get a better understanding of some of these issues, and discover how incredibly cool the female body is and how much more we still have to learn about it.

Seeker empowers the curious to understand the science shaping our world. We tell award-winning stories about the natural forces and groundbreaking innovations that impact our lives, our planet, and our universe.

Bridging the gap between science and real people | Liza Cornet | TEDxVenlo

Especially the language used in the scientific world is a problem that needs to be solved to make scientific publications more accessible. Liza Cornet, 34, lives and works in Amsterdam and has relatives in the region of Venlo. She has her own company in science communication after having worked as a scientist at different universities for ten years. She got her Phd in neurobiological aspects of antisocial behavior, which involved visiting prisons for several years. In her free time she used to design her own clothes and likes to read about personal growth, business and female leadership. She is also a keen runner and cyclist and practises yoga.

She has always wanted to do a Ted-talk and the business she’s in makes it quite worthwhile to learn the skills that Ted-talks require. Her talk will be about how necessary it is to bridge the gap between science and society. Especially since science has its own language that is often not accessible to the general public. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

The Ancient Footprints that Changed The Timeline of Human History

Our friends at MinuteEarth just released a new book! To check out “How Did Whales Get So Big?” head to: https://www.minuteearth.com/books/

In the history of our species, we still don’t know exactly how and when early humans migrated across the world, but some ancient footprints might be helping us figure it out.

Hosted by: Stefan Chin

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Sources:

The Global Last Glacial Maximum


https://www.science.org/content/article/human-footprints-near-ice-age-lake-suggest-surprisingly-early-arrival-americas
https://www.science.org/content/article/most-archaeologists-think-first-americans-arrived-boat-now-they-re-beginning-prove-it
https://www.science.org/news/2016/05/ancient-stone-tools-are-best-evidence-yet-early-peopling-americas
https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/science.abg7586?casa_token=zVUJjobz88MAAAAA:epNP7Xdlp16QLtm1emBSIWWYI7UbOMAwoO1fOHAMTXwxDziLOksMNG4ZcPyI4q3OfPDXrxf5rf_2XQ
https://www.science.org/content/article/were-humans-living-mexican-cave-during-last-ice-age
https://www.livescience.com/51793-extinct-ice-age-megafauna.html
https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.aar5040?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%20%200pubmed
http://palaeos.com/time/cosmic_calendar.html

Images:
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/roman-forum-at-sunrise-from-left-to-right-temple-of-vespasian-and-titus-church-of-gm675049578-123868323
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Spreading_homo_sapiens.svg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:IceAgeEarth.jpg
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/alaska-and-bering-sea-gm181061119-25566850
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Peopling_of_America_through_Beringia.png
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Assumed_path_of_Beringian_wolves_from_Beringia_to_Wyoming.png
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/archaeological-excavations-archaeologists-work-dig-up-an-ancient-clay-artifact-with-gm1307568921-397797184
https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/antique-illustration-of-prehistoric-flint-weapons-gm508450646-85266447
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aerial_view_of_dunefield,_White_Sands_National_Park,_New_Mexico,_United_States.png
Quebrada de Cafayate
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pleistocene_SA.jpg
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/804404
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/people-of-the-ice-age-gm537816437-58008984

Loosen Up: How Not to Become Radicalised | Sarah Carthy | TEDxGalway

What happens to a person’s mind when they become radicalised? And what can it teach us about our own rigid thinking?
Sarah is Postdoctoral Researcher in Terrorism and Political Violence at the Institute of Security and Global Affairs, Universiteit Leiden Sarah is currently working as a Postdoctoral Researcher at Leiden University’s Institute of Security and Global Affairs (ISGA) in the Hague. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

When a cow has to go, does it ask other cows to “moove?” #shorts #science #ecology #cows

Attabey Rodríguez Benítez: Writer
Kyle Nackers: Fact Checker
Bonnie Meyer: Managing Editor
Savannah Geary: Editor, Associate Producer
Sarah Suta: Producer
Caitlin Hofmeister: Executive Producer
Hank Green: Executive Producer, Host

Sources:
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/927878
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/799315
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/799314

The town where holding fireworks over your head is a tradition

Bridgwater Carnival, in Somerset, has a long tradition of squibbing: a huge procession of people holding fireworks right above their heads. This year, I got the chance to be one of the squibbers. Thanks to all the Bridgwater Carnival team: their site is https://www.bridgwatercarnival.org.uk/

Camera: Dave Mackie and Nyles Hollister
Edited by Michelle Martin: https://twitter.com/mrsmmartin

(Thanks to the person who first emailed me about this: the reply-to address on your email is broken, so I’ve never been able to get in touch to say thanks, and don’t want to name you here without permission. It was a great idea!)

I’m at https://tomscott.com
on Twitter at https://twitter.com/tomscott
on Facebook at https://facebook.com/tomscott
and on Instagram as tomscottgo

Liam Young: Planet City — a sci-fi vision of an astonishing regenerative future | TED

Get transported on a stunningly rendered, sci-fi safari through Planet City: an imaginary metropolis of 10 billion people, from the brain of director and architect Liam Young. Explore the potential outcomes of an urban space designed to house the entire population of the earth — and imagine answers to what is possible, and what is sustainable, for the planet.

Visit http://TED.com to get our entire library of TED Talks, transcripts, translations, personalized talk recommendations and more.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know.

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Why the US government is always shutting down

How the US can shut down but other countries can’t

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Towards the end of every year the countdown until the United States government goes into a shutdown begins. Congress and the President usually avoid it in the last hour, but sometimes they don’t manage to agree on a spending bill and the government actually shuts down. The US is really the only country that does this.

The longest one in history, in 2019, lasted 35 days. Federal workers — and many contractors — didn’t get a paycheck for 35 days. Some of those employees were furloughed, meaning they didn’t have to go into work, but more than half of them still had to go into the office unpaid.

So… why? It goes back to the Constitution and how the federal government funds its agencies. We talk to a law professor and workers who have been through a shutdown to explain.

Read more about solutions to government shutdowns on Vox: https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/3/21/17144504/government-shutdown-continuing-resolution-automatic

Or get into the details of the previous shutdowns: https://sgp.fas.org/crs/misc/RS20348.pdf

The Washington Post did some great reporting on the affect the 2019 shutdown had on contractors, specifically: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/business/contractors-shutdown/

And learn more about the most recent time Belgium didn’t have a formed government: https://www.brusselstimes.com/belgium/124777/belgium-breaks-own-record-for-longest-period-without-government/

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com

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Inside the James Webb Space Telescope’s Orbit Around the Sun

NASA spent billions on the James Webb Space Telescope and now we’re going to launch it really far away. But why do we need to send it so far? And what technologies are on board to support its success?
» Recap on the James Webb Space Telescope https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QO-D0bXcO6g&list=PL6uC-XGZC7X7ACJpjTf83BXAhxCHUkkDh
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Mostly known as the successor of the incredibly popular Hubble Space Telescope, Webb will observe the universe with detectors that target near and mid infrared wavelengths. This means that the instruments on board Webb are specially designed to combat some of the historic challenges astronomers have faced when trying to observe the early universe, like huge dust clouds that block the view of celestial objects, cosmological redshifting, and even interference from other bodies.

In fact, there are three things necessary to create the perfect environment for an infrared telescope; a large mirror to collect as much light as possible, extremely cold temperatures, and a clear line of sight to your target. Each detail has been thought out meticulously over the past two decades leading to this point, like orbital selection. 1.5 million kilometers is a bit of a trip to say the least.

So why are we putting Webb in such a distant orbit? Well, it’s heading to L2, the second Lagrange point around the Sun and Earth. These five points are stable configurations that allow bodies to orbit each other, but still remain in the same position relative to one another. The key to L2 is centripetal force, which you can imagine as the tension in a rope on a tether ball that keeps it connected to the pole. At L2, the centripetal force required for a small satellite-sized object to move with respect to the Earth is equal to the gravitational pull of the two larger masses. Meaning that this particularly cozy orbit has several benefits to support Webb’s mission.

#NASA #JamesWebbSpaceTelescope #science #seeker #space #technology #elements

Read More:

The largest space telescope in history is about to blow our minds
https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/22664709/james-webb-space-telescope-launch-date-december-science-hubble
“‘The Webb represents the culmination of decades, if not centuries, of astronomy,’ says Sara Seager, a planetary scientist and astrophysicist at MIT. ‘We’ve been waiting for this a very long time.'”

NASA’s new telescope will show us the infancy of the universe
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/08/16/nasas-new-telescope-will-show-us-the-infancy-of-the-universe
“The J.W.S.T. will then continue on its own, for twenty-nine days, toward a lonely, lovely orbit in space, about 1.5 million kilometres from Earth, where we will never visit it, though it will stay in constant communication with us. From Earth, it will appear ten thousand times fainter than the faintest star.”

The Five Big Ways the James Webb Telescope Will Help Astronomers Understand the Universe
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/five-big-ways-james-webb-telescope-will-help-astronomers-understand-universe-180978303/
“Webb’s conception is inspired by the Hubble Space Telescope—the 31-year-old observatory famous for capturing stunning photos of our universe’s galaxies. But Webb picks up where its predecessor falls short, says Eric Smith, Webb’s program scientist and chief scientist of NASA’s Astrophysics Division. There’s really no telescope like Webb so far, he says.”

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Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested in the compelling, innovative, and groundbreaking science that’s happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond.

Seeker empowers the curious to understand the science shaping our world. We tell award-winning stories about the natural forces and groundbreaking innovations that impact our lives, our planet, and our universe.

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Witness Numbers (and the truthful 1,662,803) – Numberphile

Featuring Matt Parker – more Parker links below.
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We Built An Unrideable Bike To Show How Bikes Work

Why are bicycles stable? The most common answer is gyroscopic effects, but this is not right. This video was sponsored by Kiwico. Get 50% off your first month of any crate at https://kiwico.com/veritasium50

Huge thanks to Rick Cavallaro for creating this bike on short notice. Thanks to all the friends who participated in the filming. Rick was also responsible for the Blackbird Faster Than The Wind Downwind Cart. https://youtu.be/jyQwgBAaBag

Great videos on bikes and counter-steering:

MinutePhysics: How Do Bikes Stay Up? https://youtu.be/oZAc5t2lkvo

MinutePhysics: The Counterintuitive Physics of Turning a Bike: https://youtu.be/llRkf1fnNDM

Why Bicycles Do Not Fall – Arend Schwab TED talk: https://youtu.be/2Y4mbT3ozcA

Today I Found Out: We Still Don’t Know How Bicycles Work https://youtu.be/YWsK6rmsKSI

TU Delft – Smart motor in handlebars prevents bicycles from falling over: https://youtu.be/rBOQp2uY_lk

Andy Ruina Explains How Bicycles Balance Themselves: https://youtu.be/NcZCzr9ExKk

▀▀▀
More References:

TU Delft Bicycle Site: http://bicycle.tudelft.nl/schwab/Bicycle/

Bicycle stability program: http://ruina.tam.cornell.edu/research/topics/bicycle_mechanics/JBike6_web_folder/index.htm

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Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Luis Felipe, Anton Ragin, Paul Peijzel, S S, Benedikt Heinen, Diffbot, Micah Mangione, Juan Benet, Ruslan Khroma, Richard Sundvall, Lee Redden, Sam Lutfi, MJP, Gnare, Nick DiCandilo, Dave Kircher, Edward Larsen, Burt Humburg, Blake Byers, Dumky, Mike Tung, Evgeny Skvortsov, Meekay, Ismail Öncü Usta, Crated Comments, Anna, Mac Malkawi, Michael Schneider, Oleksii Leonov, Jim Osmun, Tyson McDowell, Ludovic Robillard, Jim buckmaster, fanime96, Ruslan Khroma, Robert Blum, Vincent, Marinus Kuivenhoven, Alfred Wallace, Arjun Chakroborty, Joar Wandborg, Clayton Greenwell, Michael Krugman, Cy ‘kkm’ K’Nelson,Ron Neal

▀▀▀
Written by Derek Muller
Filmed by Trenton Oliver, Raquel Nuno and Derek Muller
Edited by Derek Muller
Music from Epidemic Sound and Jonny Hyman
Produced by Derek Muller, Petr Lebedev and Emily Zhang

The Future of Work – A Place of Belonging | Krys Burnette | TEDxNuremberg

In the workplace, we are all striving for a sense of belonging. We want to be sure our voices are heard and that we can turn our ideas into action. But what can go wrong when the principles of equity, diversity, and inclusion are missing? What are the benefits if we do apply these principles? Krys Burnette shares her insights and best practices for the futures of our workplaces. Krys has consulted and worked with large Global enterprises. Currently, she is leading global organizational transformation efforts focusing on people, culture, and organizational development. In her role, she empowers individuals and leaders to be more inclusive, innovative, and responsive to build stronger teams, organizations, and businesses for the future.

The year 2020 and 2021 is marked with uncertainty and complexity. And even though individuals adjust to a “different normal”, Krys Burnette continues to share her passion about the value of equity, diversity and inclusion (ED&I) in all areas of our lives. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Why Do Manatees Die When Power Plants Shut Down?

This episode is sponsored by Wren, a website where you calculate your carbon footprint. Sign up to make a monthly contribution to offset your carbon footprint or support rainforest protection projects: https://www.wren.co/start/scishow

While the Florida manatee is threatened by human activity in a myriad of ways, perhaps the most surprising among those threats is the closing of aging power plants.

Hosted by: Michael Aranda

SciShow is on TikTok! Check us out at https://www.tiktok.com/@scishow
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Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow
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Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for helping us keep SciShow free for everyone forever:

Alisa Sherbow, Silas Emrys, Chris Peters, Adam Brainard, Dr. Melvin Sanicas, Melida Williams, Jeremy Mysliwiec, charles george, Tom Mosner, Christopher R Boucher, Alex Hackman, Piya Shedden, GrowingViolet, Nazara, Matt Curls, Ash, Eric Jensen, Jason A Saslow, Kevin Bealer, Sam Lutfi, James Knight, Christoph Schwanke, Bryan Cloer, Jeffrey Mckishen

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Sources:
https://academic.oup.com/jmammal/article/93/6/1504/912796
https://www.mmc.gov/wp-content/uploads/floridamanatees.pdf
https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/11016985.pdf
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6871784/
https://www.mmc.gov/wp-content/uploads/powerplants1.pdf
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0058978

Image Sources:
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/manatee-sea-cow-gm183859426-15983777
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/close-up-of-florida-manatee-underwater-slow-motion-btdrdk0znvjvgvw50z
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/manatee-portrait-gm138186819-8646269
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/manatee-in-the-crystal-river-gm944691880-258052801
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/flordia-springs-gm1165177603-320516790
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/two-cooling-towers-and-smokestack-at-coastal-powerplant-with-steam-rising-from-one-gm1254855559-366924462
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/florida-manatee-gm640026820-115702663
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/aerial-drone-shot-of-swimming-with-endangered-florida-manatees-hk76ptawnejvgvvyta
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/peaceful-manatee-gm1297683258-390754305
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/aerial-drone-shot-of-crystal-springs-river-florida-manatees-htvdx5rbhejvgvyxep

When Food Goes Bad | Compilation

See every side of every news story by downloading the free Ground News app: https://ground.news/scishow

Food can’t stay fresh forever. From moldy bread to brown apples, here’s the science behind what happens when food goes bad.

Hosted by: Hank Green

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Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow
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Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for helping us keep SciShow free for everyone forever:

Alisa Sherbow, Silas Emrys, Chris Peters, Adam Brainard, Dr. Melvin Sanicas, Melida Williams, Jeremy Mysliwiec, charles george, Tom Mosner, Christopher R Boucher, Alex Hackman, Piya Shedden, GrowingViolet, Nazara, Matt Curls, Ash, Eric Jensen, Jason A Saslow, Kevin Bealer, Sam Lutfi, James Knight, Christoph Schwanke, Bryan Cloer, Jeffrey Mckishen

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Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet?
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———-
Original Episodes:
Food Mold 101: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyqOE2Z-MdU
Why Do Apples Turn Brown?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbArE5dv0W4
What Do Food Expiration Dates Actually Mean?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CK8FrN1gmf0
Why Can’t You Compost Meat?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHqTQPARVe0
Pickles, Probiotics, and Why Rotten Food Is Good For You: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vwfGxVWYNk
Animal Survival Skills: Poison Edition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNFUNrH9Ip0

What clowns can teach you about vulnerability in leadership | Michaud Garneau | TEDxWilsonPark

The role of the clown is to connect with the audience. Their role is to build trust, build understanding and reflect back to the audience what they see through their own absurdity. The role of the clown is to laugh at themselves, to take risks, to show what is possible. At the core of the clown is the ability to show the deep vulnerability in ourselves so that others can see themselves there too. The clown is stripped bare, put on a platter and lies there, unashamed because that’s what we all look like when we take our masks off. This is the type of leadership the world requires, the type that shows what is possible, that makes failing okay, that acknowledges the absurdity of life and enthusiastically chooses to participate. The clown is urgent, we need it now more than ever. Michaud Garneau is a professional facilitator with over a decade of teaching and training experience. He’s created and facilitated workshops for Fortune 500 companies, not-for-profits, as well as developed curriculum for elementary, high school and post-secondary institutions.
Michaud draws on his experience as an award-winning performance artist to create highly engaging and memorable learning experiences.

Michaud likes to shake things up. He’s no stranger to helping leaders stretch comfortably into uncomfortable situations. And as founder of Weird is Nrml, he’s on a mission to disrupt the
conventional norms of leadership. Professionally trained as a clown and with a background in theatre, he has a gift for teaching people how to trust themselves, take bigger risks,
and genuinely connect with others.

In 2018 Michaud founded Weird Is Nrml (WIN) because he saw a huge disconnect between organizations asking for creativity, collaboration and innovation from their teams and the way those organizations interacted with and led the humans that make up those teams. Having been a leader in highly creative and collaborative fields, i.e. clowning and experimental puppet theatre, Michaud knew a thing or two about building creative and collaborative cultures and wanted to help.

The idea: take the leadership beliefs and processes that worked in art and transpose them to the business world.

The result: people are raving about the program as life-changing and that it not only helps in their work life, but their personal relationships too.

Building empathy, collaboration, communication and a willingness to be uncomfortable is at the core of the WIN training programs. With a hands-on approach to learning, participants are given the opportunity to practice and develop their skills in a safe and encouraging space. Michaud believes a willingness to be uncomfortable is not some innate bravery, rather, a skill that can be developed through exposure and practice. WIN provides that exposure and practice in a supportive environment that builds teams equipped to handle the challenges of the future.

To learn more about Michaud and Weird Is Nrml visit www.weirdisnrml.com or follow him on LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/michaudgarneau/ This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Misconceptions About the Cold War

The Cold War is relatively recent history, but there are till plenty of myths about it to debunk. Justin wages war against Cold War misconceptions, from the romantic image of the Cold War-era spy to the comedic oeuvre of Yakov Smirnoff (sort of).

If you think the only Cold War close call was the Cuban Missile Crisis, you’ll want to watch. You’ll learn about why the end of the Cold War is a bit harder to pin down than you might think, and how toilet paper (or lack thereof) led to a breakthrough for military intelligence.

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Nabiha Saklayen: Could you recover from illness … using your own stem cells? | TED

What if diseases could be treated with a patient’s own cells, precisely and on demand? Biotech entrepreneur Nabiha Saklayen explains how we could harness advances in biology, machine learning and lasers to create personalized stem cell banks — and develop medicine uniquely designed for each of our bodies.

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What Really Goes Into Storing Food for the Winter?

Our friends at MinuteEarth just released a new book! To check out “How Did Whales Get So Big?” head to: https://store.dftba.com/collections/minuteearth

When birds and squirrels cache food for the winter, it means they have to remember where to find that food later. Their strategies for finding their hidden feasts includes memory tricks and changing brains.

Hosted by: Michael Aranda

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Image Sources:
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What does “good food” mean, and how do we make it affordable? | Mark Bittman | TEDxBoston

What does “good food” mean, exactly, and how do we produce and make it available and affordable? Mark Bittman provides some answers. Mark Bittman is the author of 30 books, including the How to Cook Everything series and the #1 New York Times bestseller VB6: Eat Vegan Before 6:00 to Lose Weight and Restore Your Health . . . for Good. He was a food journalist and columnist, opinion columnist, and the lead magazine food writer at the New York Times, where he started writing in 1984 and stayed for 30 years.

Bittman has starred in four television series, including Showtime’s Emmy-winning Years of Living Dangerously. He is a longtime TODAY regular and has made hundreds of television, radio, and podcast appearances, including on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, RealTime with Bill Maher, and CBS’s The Dish; plus NPR’s All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Morning Edition.

Bittman has written for countless publications and spoken at dozens of universities and conferences; his 2007 TED talk, “What’s wrong with what we eat,” has almost five million views. He was distinguished fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, and a fellow at the Union of Concerned Scientists. He has received six James Beard Awards and an IACP Award.

Bittman is currently Special Advisor on Food Policy at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, where he teaches and hosts a lecture series called Food, Public Health, and Social Justice. He is also the editor-in-chief of Heated, and is working on a book and television series titled Animal Vegetable Junk. His latest book, with David Katz, MD, is How to Eat. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Richard Wilkinson: The link between inequality and anxiety | TED

Why are global levels of anxiety and depression so high? Social epidemiologist Richard Wilkinson presents compelling data on the impact of inequality on mental health and social relationships in countries around the world. “Inequality,” he says, “is the enemy between us.”

Visit http://TED.com to get our entire library of TED Talks, transcripts, translations, personalized talk recommendations and more.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know.

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The Big Bang Didn’t Happen Where You Think

Where is the universe expanding into? Where did the big bang happen?
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Stock footage provided by Beachfront downloaded from www.videvo.net
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If you liked this video check out these:
A picture of the beginning of the universe
→ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rut6f…
Why is the Universe Flat? ft. Prof Alan Guth
→ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTUsO…

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Twitter/Insta/Facebook/TikTok: @thephysicsgirl

Sources:
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1913LowOB…2…56S
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https://phys.org/news/2015-12-big-theory.html
https://bigthink.com/starts-with-a-bang/big-bang-beginning-universe/
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Four tipping points Africa can expect from climate change | Francois Engelbrecht | TEDxJohannesburg

It is common cause that with the level of global warming currently at 1.1 degrees Celsius as of 2021, we are now close to exceeding the dangerous threshold of 1.5 degrees. In fact, according to Francois Engelbrecht, atmospheric modelling specialist, it might already be too late to avoid that mark. He and other climate scientists warn that four important tipping points could impact Africa in particular. Droughts lasting three to five years will occur more frequently in southern Africa. Also, as the global climate warms, Africans will more regularly face the risk of life-threatening heat waves. Further, the combination of heatwaves and droughts could collapse significant crop and livestock farming sectors. And lastly, intense tropical cyclones may move further south than ever before. The good news is that peak global warming is still in humanity’s hands – we can still take the vital actions we need to avoid catastrophe. However, African countries will need to stand stronger than ever in seeking support from rich countries to prepare for the increasing impacts of a warming planet. Francois Engelbrecht is one of South Africa’s pre-eminent climatologists. He is Lead Author on the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report. Further, Francois spearheads the climate studies, modelling, and environmental health research group at the CSIR. He has carved a niche as a specialist in numerical climate model development and regional climate modelling and drives the development of the first African-based Earth system. He is an associate professor at North-West University and an honorary research associate at Wits. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

My nanotechnology story | Arben Merkoci | TEDxTirana

ARBEN MERKOÇI is ICREA Professor and director of the Nanobioelectronics & Biosensors Group at Institut Català de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, situated at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. His research is focused on the integration of biological molecules and other species with micro- and nanostructures of interest in the design of novel (bio) sensors. Professor Merkoçi has published over 319 articles and served as scientific evaluator and member of panels of experts of various international governmental and nongovernmental agencies, as well as scientific committee member of many international congresses, director of several workshops and other scientific events and has been invited to give plenary lectures and keynote speeches in various countries. Professor Merkoçi helped establish and is currently leading the first science-research unit of Nanotechnology and Nanoscience in Albania as part of the Albanian Academy of Science, called NANOAlb. ARBEN MERKOÇI is ICREA Professor and director of the Nanobioelectronics & Biosensors Group at Institut Català de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, situated at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. His research is focused on the integration of biological molecules and other species with micro- and nanostructures of interest in the design of novel (bio) sensors. Professor Merkoçi has published over 319 articles and served as scientific evaluator and member of panels of experts of various international governmental and nongovernmental agencies, as well as scientific committee member of many international congresses, director of several workshops and other scientific events and has been invited to give plenary lectures and keynote speeches in various countries. Professor Merkoçi helped establish and is currently leading the first science-research unit of Nanotechnology and Nanoscience in Albania as part of the Albanian Academy of Science, called NANOAlb. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Square One at 60 | Steven Kunes | TEDxChestnutStreetStudio

Comedy writer Steven Kunes didn’t think it was so funny to find himself starting over at age 60, nor was there any Hollywood ending in sight. Discovered at 26 by TV legend Norman Lear, and following three decades in network television, Kunes had a noteworthy self-destruction that found him homeless and forced to rethink, and redefine, the term Square One. Now 65, Mr. Kunes currently produces “Over My Dead Body,” an original comedy series that features interviews with important figures from our history and culture — without mentioning they just happen to be dead. The authenticity and candidness of this speaker will inspire anybody starting over later in life. Comedy writer Steven Kunes didn’t think it was so funny to find himself starting over at age 60, nor was there any Hollywood ending in sight. Discovered at 26 by TV legend Norman Lear, and following three decades in network television, Kunes had a noteworthy self-destruction that found him homeless and forced to rethink, and redefine, the term Square One. Mr. Kunes now produces “Over My Dead Body,” an original comedy series that features interviews with important figures from our history and culture — without mentioning they just happen to be dead. The authenticity and candidness of this speaker will inspire anybody starting over later in life. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx