A very challenging question about fractions

Can you solve this challenging problem? Thanks to Ramesh for the suggestion!

0:00 Problem
1:18 Method 1
4:11 Method 2

(Sorry about the repost! In the previous video I had m = -1 by mistake around 3:05. I thank Andy Chen for alerting me of the typo! This is the original video: https://youtu.be/w6xul7j4t_U)

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Should social media platforms censor hate speech? | Nadine Strossen | Big Think

Should social media platforms censor hate speech?
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Should social media companies censor hate speech on their platforms? Nadine Strossen, law professor and former president of the ACLU, says that while tech giants have no legal obligation to respect First Amendment rights, she urges them to allow as much free speech as is feasible.

Those who advocate censorship on social media worry about the harm caused by hate or disinformation, but they never examine whether censorship is going to be effective in actually addressing the root issue, says Strossen.

Online or offline, censorship doesn’t work to make the world better. “Every hate speech law around the world to this day is disproportionately enforced consistently against the very minority groups who are hoped to be protected,” says Strossen.

This video was made possible thanks to Big Think’s partnership with the Institute for Humane Studies. https://theihs.org/
———————————————————————————-
NADINE STORSSEN:

Nadine Strossen is the John Marshall Harlan II Professor of Law at New York Law School. From 1991 through 2008, she served as President of the American Civil Liberties Union, the first woman to head the nation’s largest and oldest civil liberties organization. Her most recent book is HATE: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not Censorship. You check it at https://amzn.to/2PyhqnQ
———————————————————————————-
TRANSCRIPT:

NADINE STROSSEN: Social media platforms present the same issues that we have been grappling with with respect to older media. But throughout human history every time a new medium of communication comes along many people, including many government officials, become very exercised about the new power and the allegedly new harms that are posed. So, we went through this when radio was invented, when the telephone was invented, when television was invented, when the World Wide Web came to people’s attention. And, in fact, I have read that when the printing press was invented and when papyrus was invented there were similar eruptions of fear about this great new power to distribute information and the harm that could be done through information and disinformation. So, I think it’s really important for us to have historic humility and not see what we’re going through now as inherently different and more dangerous than the past. And I think that the same fundamental principles that have applied to other media should apply to social media as well.

First of all, as private sector entities, social media companies have absolutely no legal obligation to respect First Amendment rights, free speech rights, for anybody else. So, just as I have no right to participate in your wonderful film and I have no right to have an op-ed in The New York Times, I have no right to have my post displayed on Facebook or Twitter and so forth. Moreover, those companies have their own First Amendment rights to make their own editorial decisions about what expression they are going to allow on their platform and what they’re not going to allow. I, as somebody who defends free speech rights for media companies, along with other companies, would oppose government restriction on the ability of these companies to decide what they will air and what they will not air. However, I will raise my voice to urge these companies to adhere, as closely as feasible, to the same basic standards that are reflected in the First Amendment. Because I think that for all of the potential damage that can be done by various kinds of online communications, including disinformation and so-called fake news and political ads and so forth, that far more harm is done when we empower these largely unaccountable private sector really powerful entities to pick and choose what expression is going to be aired and what will not be aired. And that danger is especially great when we are talking about political speech. The supreme court has consistently said, throughout history, of all expression that is important in our system of government by far the most important is speech about public affairs, speech about politics. “”We, the people,”” to quote the opening words of our constitution, we wield sovereign power but how can we do that responsibly or effectively if we do not have access, full access, to information about those who are running for office? Those who are seeking our votes? Those who are making…

Read the full transcript at https://bigthink.com/videos/social-media-censorship

Why Are Periodical Cicadas So … Periodical?

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Certain cicada species in North America emerge from the ground by the millions every 13 or 17 years. But why those specific intervals? Are cicadas secretly prime-number-loving mathematicians?!

Hosted by: Michael Aranda

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Sources:
https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1890/04-1175
https://academic.oup.com/aesa/article/104/3/443/22755
https://academic.oup.com/mbe/article/36/6/1187/5372347
https://www.pnas.org/content/110/17/6919
https://peerj.com/articles/5282/
https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1890/10-1583.1
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/668596?seq=1
https://www.jstor.org/stable/2463533?seq=1
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-are-cicadas-180975009/
https://www.aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=512

Images:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Magicicada_septendecim_TPopp.jpg


https://freesound.org/people/dethrok/sounds/272169/
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/sb0129-a-cicada-climbs-a-tree-this-cicada-is-part-of-brood-viii-which-only-appears-in-western-pennsylvania-every-17-years-rjgvnyn6njw15ht2p
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/cicada-nymph-emerging-from-ground-vdzlqfd
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/sb0131-a-cicada-climbs-a-tree-this-cicada-is-part-of-brood-viii-which-only-appears-in-western-pennsylvania-every-17-years-sc1_ni4tvjw1adpud
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/cicada-nymph-climbing-tree-ffugvu6
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/greengrocer-cicada-insect-cicadinae-australasiae-oxc3sbd
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/crow-looking-for-food-on-the-ground-rwex91emio6dwz27
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/brand-new-baby-birds-resting-in-the-nest-blmadpqzfmjiyc3rzi
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/birds-flying-in-blue-sky-tranquil-background-nature-scene-bpl7ub5slkanm1ztg
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/slow-motion-footage-of-a-cute-little-squirrel-looking-for-food-on-a-rainy-day-hwmzas6xdkkv2275r
https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/high-quality-realistic-trendy-no-frame-smartphone-with-blank-white-screen-mockup-gm1224237679-359894798
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/seventeen-year-cicada-gm178592206-24921996
https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/calendar-deadline-or-event-reminder-notification-gm1195104023-340548700

5 DISTURBING Facts About Disney!

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How does stress affect a child’s development and academic potential? | Pamela Cantor

New videos DAILY: https://bigth.ink

Join Big Think Edge for exclusive video lessons from top thinkers and doers: https://bigth.ink/Edge

———————————————————————————-

The majority of growth of the human brain happens after birth.While unrelenting stress can damage developing structures of the limbic system, calibrated challenge can positively stimulate brain growth. Teachers have an important role in assuring students of their safety when taking on new challenges.This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer “one size fits all” education reform.

———————————————————————————-

PAMELA CANTOR

Pamela Cantor, M.D. practiced child psychiatry for nearly two decades, specializing in trauma. She founded Turnaround for Children after co-authoring a study on the impact of the 9/11 attacks on New York City schoolchildren. She is a Visiting Scholar in Education at Harvard University and a leader of the Science of Learning and Development Alliance.

———————————————————————————-

TRANSCRIPT:

PAMELA CANTOR: We’re mammals. And as mammals, the majority of the growth of our brains happens after we’re born. So this is a very, very crucial thing to understand. The majority of the growth of the human brain happens after birth. And we know that it takes a long time for the human brain to develop. There are critical periods like zero to five, and there are new critical periods of great sensitivity that are being discovered. The newest of them is actually adolescence. But a human baby has what’s called “experience dependent growth.” Their brains are astonishingly malleable, and they grow in response to the experiences and relationships that we expose them to. So one of the first principles of human development and brain development is this astonishing feature of the human brain because it’s made up of tissue that is the most susceptible to change from experience of any tissue in the human body.

There are three things to remember about brain development. One is astonishing malleability, experience dependent growth and the role of context. But I still haven’t told you how context actually gets under the skin and into the brain. And in order to do that I need to tell you about the limbic system. The limbic system is the part of the brain that responds to things like emotion, attention, concentration, memory and it consists of three structures. There’s the prefrontal cortex, which involves focus and attention. There’s the hippocampus, which has many functions in memory. And then there’s the amygdala which is the emotion center of the human brain. These three structures develop together. They’re intimately connected and cross wired. The limbic system is the learning center of the brain. But to talk about how context gets inside, I want to give you two examples. And the two examples are the systems that govern stress and the systems that govern love and trust.

The first is our stress response system, and this system is mediated by the hormone cortisol. So when we experience stress, we get that fight-flight-freeze feeling where our heart starts to pound and the hair goes up on the back of our neck. And that stress response is actually a good thing. It’s adaptive. It helps us focus. It helps us prepare for something like a recital or a performance.

When this system is triggered over and over again by unrelenting stress it can get locked in the on position. And when that happens to children because of overwhelming stress, stress that is not buffered by the presence of an adult this kind of stress can produce damage and consequence to the developing structures of the limbic system. In fact, what can happen is the amygdala, the emotion center of the brain can grow disproportionately to the development of the other two structures.

And those other two structures, the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus are vital for learning. So adversity doesn’t just happen to children, it happens inside their brains and bodies through the biologic mechanism of stress. So that’s an example of how context can get inside our bodies and our brains. But fortunately, there’s an upside to this story in the hormone system that’s mediated by the hormone oxytocin. Oxytocin is known as our love-trust hormone. And interestingly that hormone has the same target in the brain as cortisol, the structures of the limbic system. Because the limbic system is covered with receptors for these two hormonal systems. So when a person has the experience of a human relationship that can buffer stress what…

For the full transcript, check out https://bigthink.com/yes-every-kid/how-does-stress-affect-a-childs-development-and-academic-potential

How bad is Exponential Growth? – Computerphile

Exponential growth is a term that’s used a lot, but our intuition can play tricks on understanding it. Dr Tim Muller takes us through some examples that demonstrate just how quickly things get out of hand.

https://www.facebook.com/computerphile

This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley.

Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: https://bit.ly/nottscomputer

Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran’s Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com

Best Nap Ever: Rotifers Wake Up After 24,000 Years

This episode is brought to you by the song Like This — Patrick Olsen’s new single. It’s available now on all streaming services.https://streamlink.to/like-this

Tiny creatures called rotifers seem to have no problem continuing their lives after waking from a refreshing 24,000-year nap. And DNA samples from goats that lived 30,000 years ago tell us a bit about how humans were managing them back then.

Hosted by: Hank Green

SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org
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Sources:
https://www.eurekalert.org/emb_releases/2021-06/cp-arl060221.php
https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)00624-2
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/article/mammoths
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/dec/30/siberia-permafrost-yields-well-preserved-ice-age-woolly-rhino
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/ancient-roundworms-allegedly-resurrected-russian-permafrost-180969782/
https://www.eurekalert.org/emb_releases/2021-06/tcd-1dp060321.php
https://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.2100901118

Images:
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/266742.php?from=505163
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/an-image-of-a-growing-rotifers-in-a-horizontal-view-gm116828387-6009634
Permafrost Polygons
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/266744.php?from=505163
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/ice-under-permafrost-soil-in-spitzbergen-gm184936479-18615248
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rotifer_animation.gif
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/strongyloides-stercoralis-gm640940844-116015921
https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/115390032
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/goat-gm855970482-140943771
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/goats-going-on-a-pasture-land-rtcyb6yslixi7ylwq
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/zagros-mountains-gm535220029-57063566
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/bezoar-ibex-gm618051010-107444347
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/alpine-ibex-or-capra-ibex-gran-paradiso-national-park-aosta-va-gm1315067889-403135238
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/goat-heard-on-meadow-sivu7xkiwj831tois
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/mixed-race-woman-enjoying-morning-gm1149534440-310837861
https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/rotifer-gm479379639-36252360
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/baby-goats-fighting-in-farm-zoo-blzaogf5irz5suk4

Help close the relationship gap; help change the world | Joey Womack | TEDxAtlanta

Joey Womack proposes that we can all play a part in equalizing socio-economic disparities in our community by helping to close the relationship gap. Joey Womack’s passion lies in helping to equalize socio-economic disparities in communities all over the world. His goal: To positively impact 1 billion people by the year 2039. He is the founder and CEO of nonprofit Goodie Nation whose initiatives are designed to close the relationship gap for tech-focused social entrepreneurs and diverse founders.

Joey has received multiple industry accolades for his commitment to and work in bridging socio-economic disparities. He is the recipient of awards from SOCAP Global, the Technology Association of Georgia and Startup Atlanta. He was named to Atlanta Magazine’s list of 500 Most Influential Business Leaders and Huffington Post’s Top 20 Innovators in the Atlanta Tech Startup Scene.

He serves on the boards for Startup Atlanta, Venture Atlanta, and the Georgia Social Impact Collaborative as well as advisory boards for SXSW and SOCAP’s Spectrum Conference. Joey earned his master’s degree in business at Florida A&M University. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

The best career path isn’t always a straight line | Sarah Ellis and Helen Tupper

Visit http://TED.com to get our entire library of TED Talks, transcripts, translations, personalized talk recommendations and more.

Conventional wisdom frames the ideal career path as a linear one — a ladder to be climbed with a single-minded focus to get to the top. Career development consultants Sarah Ellis and Helen Tupper invite you to replace this outdated and limiting model with “squiggly” careers: dynamic, open-ended growth paths tailor-made for your individual needs, talents and ambitions. A radical rethink for anyone who feels restricted and defined by the limits of the corporate ladder.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know.

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TED’s videos may be used for non-commercial purposes under a Creative Commons License, Attribution–Non Commercial–No Derivatives (or the CC BY – NC – ND 4.0 International) and in accordance with our TED Talks Usage Policy (https://www.ted.com/about/our-organization/our-policies-terms/ted-talks-usage-policy). For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request at https://media-requests.ted.com

Des motivations qui résistent à la fatigue grâce aux neurosciences | Bernard Anselem | TEDxKedgeBS

Pourquoi certains gravissent des montagnes, alors que d’autres se découragent ou se lassent en cours de route ? Face aux efforts à fournir, il faut un désir durable qui ne s’épuise pas. Comment l’alimenter ?
Connaître les lois neuronales des motivations profondes, permet de progresser en efficacité, de donner le meilleur de soi, de libérer notre énergie et résister au découragement.
Ces connaissances nous donnent les clés pour sélectionner des motivations qui résistent à l’usure du temps “l’habituation” en stimulant quotidiennement nos réseaux du désir et du plaisir. Une fois sélectionnées, nous allons apprendre à les utiliser en période de doute, grâce à une simple mémorisation d’état d’esprit et de comportement.
Bernard Anselem, médecin neuropsychologue et auteur conférencier nous partagera ses connaissances concernant la motivation via la neuro-psychose. Il nous aidera à comprendre comment tirer le meilleur de son cerveau. ?
?⚕️ Plus exactement, il répandra ses idées sur la façon de trouver des moyens durables, voire indestructibles grâce aux neurosciences cognitives sur comment résister au découragement et à la lassitude en connaissant mieux nos fonctionnements neurologiques This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

How to Create Your Own Recipe for Success | Jason Licker | TEDxUCSD

In his talk, Jason uses his cross-culture culinary experiences to demonstrate the power held inside each of us to create our own recipes for success. Jason shows how his greatest loss ultimately led to discovering his passion and how he harnessed grief into exploration. From moving to Shanghai as a pastry chef, to becoming an award-winning cookbook author, to winning Iron Chef Thailand, Jason hopes that his experiences can serve as a guidebook for those in pursuit of living life as boldly and unapologetically as possible.
Jason’s passion for pastry, life and travel has taken him across the globe for a true culinary experience. His first internship was at Union Square Café in New York while training at the French Culinary Institute’s Pastry Arts Program. Jason then earned a pastry cook position in the world renown Jean Georges Restaurant, an experience which prepared him for his first Pastry Chef position at Metrazur for Charlie Palmer at the age of 23. Jason then opened the The Shore Club in Miami Beach where he was promoted to Executive Pastry Chef overseeing all Food and Beverage Outlets including Nobu Miami Beach, where Jason was first exposed to Asian Cuisine. Jason has held Executive Pastry Chef positions at the Peninsula New York, The Westin Bund in Shanghai, The Venetian Macau Hotel and Resort, The JW Marriott Hong Kong and formerly was the Corporate Pastry Chef for Cé La Vi Restaurants Worldwide. His win at Iron Chef Thailand is an affirmation of his elite Pastry status. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Sometimes, the solution is right in front of you. | Julien Hodara | TEDxYouth@EIB

Julien Hodara is a world renowned business man and CEO of telecommunication company Libon. In this talk, he will address a very important issue in business : the solution. Indeed, business men often have problems and Julien explains that most of the time, the solution is very simple. Julien Hodara is the CEO of Libon: a dialing application for diasporas to call their loved ones who do not have access to internet or smartphones. Between 2000 and 2006, Julien worked at the Digital department of Warner Music France. Between 2006 and 2009, he worked for Novedia Consulting in Paris, where he made numerous missions for European telcos. He was hired by Orange in 2009 to officially become the CEO of the subsidiary of of Orange that he created : WorMee. In 2013, while doing his MBA at HEC Paris, he started to work for the Libon team. In 2018, the Libon team operated a management buy out from Orange and Julien became the CEO of the company. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

How India ran out of oxygen

And why does this keep happening?

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In April 2021, India began registering some of the highest numbers of Covid-19 cases in the world. When that happened, the demand for life-saving oxygen soared too. But India wasn’t able to keep up, adding avoidable deaths to a second wave of Covid-19 that has devastated the country. The oxygen shortage seemed to have caught India off guard. That made the news in this pandemic, but India has run out of oxygen before. So why does this keep happening?

Read more about the government’s stalled plans to improve oxygen access: https://scroll.in/article/992537/india-is-running-out-of-oxygen-covid-19-patients-are-dying-because-the-government-wasted-time

Read more of Vox’s coverage on India’s oxygen crisis: https://www.vox.com/22428619/india-covid-oxygen-shortage-supply-tankers-vaccines

For more on India’s oxygen access, check out PATH’s 2018 report: https://path.azureedge.net/media/documents/India_Oxygen_Country_Report.pdf

Check out PATH’s Oxygen Needs Tracker to learn about global demand: https://www.path.org/programs/market-dynamics/covid-19-oxygen-needs-tracker/

Read more about the oxygen crisis: https://www.indiaspend.com/covid-19/as-covid-19-cases-increased-oxygen-beds-fell-data-show-743552
https://www.indiaspend.com/india-working-to-avert-an-oxygen-crisis-during-covid-19/

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Navigating reality: It’s all about perspective | Daniel Schmachtenberger

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OVERVIEW
Social philosopher Daniel Schmachtenberger explains why the capacity to hold the relationships between many perspectives at once can inform our choice-making and help us navigate reality.

Transperspectival thinking is useful in the abstract—like Schmachtenberger’s example of two tribes of dimensional beings—as well as in the real world.

Try to recall this lesson on transperspectival thinking during your next political debate or discussion and see how it may change your reactions and the way you navigate political realities.
———————————————————————————-
DANIEL SCHMACHTENBERGER
Daniel Schmachtenberger is a social philosopher whose central focus is civilization design: Developing new capacities for sense-making and choice-making, individually and collectively, to support conscious sustainable evolution. He shares on these topics at civilizationemerging.com.
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Can you trust your memory? – Sheila Marie Orfano

Explore the Rashomon effect, where individuals give significantly different but equally believable accounts of the same event.

A samurai is found dead in a quiet bamboo grove. One by one, the crime’s only known witnesses recount their version of the events. But as they each tell their tale, it becomes clear that every testimony is plausible yet different. And each witness implicates themselves. What’s going on? Sheila Marie Orfano explores the phenomenon of warring perspectives known as the Rashomon effect.

Lesson by Sheila Marie Orfano, directed by Jeremiah Dickey.

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Hive mind: The good, the bad, and the viral | Sarah Rose Cavanagh | Big Think

Hive mind: The good, the bad, and the viral | Sarah Rose Cavanagh
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The hive mind is a shared intelligence or consciousness between groups of people. It determines what we think is culturally acceptable, what we think is fashionable, and even what we think is true. We source most of our information and beliefs from other people and not from ourselves, says psychology professor Sarah Rose Cavanagh.

The hive mind often comes under fire in the U.S. because it is a highly individualistic culture that frowns upon things like mindless conformity, echo chambers, and group think. Those are the antisocial aspects of collective thinking.

There are also prosocial features, explains Cavanagh. The hive mind allows us to draw on collective knowledge in positive ways, without needing to reinvent the wheel each time.
—————————————-
DR. SARAH ROSE CAVANAGH

Dr. Sarah Rose Cavanagh is a psychologist, professor, writer, and Associate Director for grants and research for the Center for Teaching Excellence at Assumption College. Her research focuses on affective science, specifically emotion regulation and mood and anxiety disorders. Dr. Cavanagh is the author of Hivemind: The New Science of Tribalism In Our Divided World, (Grand Central Publishing, 2019) and The Spark of Learning: Energizing the College Classroom with the Science of Emotion, (West Virginia University Press, 2016). She lives in Massachusetts.

Purchase “Hivemind: The New Science of Tribalism In Our Divided World” here: https://amzn.to/2LEAZcc
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TRANSCRIPT: The hivemind is a couple of different things. It is firstly the idea that we are a collective as much as we are individuals and that we can enter this frame of mind where we’re sharing attention and we’re sharing goals and we’re sharing emotions. You can feel this most often if you think about your own experiences in attending rock concerts or sporting events, singing together in a choir where we seem to meld together a bit and share these experiences. But the hivemind is also the extent to which our understanding of the world is sourced collectively from each other, from our social others rather than just through independent decisions and experiences. So much of what we think is acceptable, what we think is fashionable and even what we think is true is sourced from other people and not ourselves.

We are tremendously influenced by the people that we admire and the people that we feel close to. Without even realizing it we can be shaped by these ideas. A good example of that I think is the ice bucket challenge which was a really odd thing if you stop to think about it. It’s wonderful that we raised all that money for ALS but this impulse to do this thing just because everyone else is doing it and to do something so uncomfortable and strange as pour a bucket of ice over your head just spread like wildfire. And you can see this with most things that go viral. They don’t always make complete sense. People aren’t always thinking through. They just do it because we’re influenced by each other so profoundly.

We are such an individualistic society that we tend to focus more on the bad aspects of the collective. We talk a lot about conformity. We talk a lot, especially since the 2016 election people are focusing a lot on echo chambers, on group polarization which refers to the fact that when we talk to only people who agree with us we not only become more entrenched in our views but we move more extreme. And we’ve been focusing a lot of our discussion on those dangers of collective thinking and I absolutely believe that there are many dangers of collective thinking. But at the same time we can source that collective thinking in powerful ways. So some of the best approaches to disinformation that I have seen involve relying more on the hivemind. Not expecting every individual person to go through every step of digital literacy and to evaluate each piece of information, but rather to source broadly and look for things that other people have already done. Not recreate the wheel but see if this idea has been debunked by other reputable sources at the same time. And so I think that there are ways that we can tap into the collective that are positive and prosocial as well as negative and antisocial.

If we believe that we’re complete individuals and that all of our opinions and all of our thoughts are clearly our own. Then we’re more susceptible I think to those dangers of the hivemind. If we question – and this is something I do with my students all the time is to try to get both them and me into a place where we can question our own beliefs, where we can ask where are these coming from. What’s the source of these beliefs.

Why Animals Keep Self-Amputating

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Some lizards will lose a tail to avoid becoming a meal, but there’s more than one reason for animals to self-amputate.

Hosted by: Rose Bear Don’t Walk

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Sources:


https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)00047-6
https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/28/4/1047/3748244
https://theconversation.com/the-extreme-tactic-of-self-amputation-means-survival-in-the-animal-kingdom-118503
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/evo.13948
https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/28/4/1047/3748244
https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/17/3/353/201485
https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/16/2/377/297882

Image Sources:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Elysia_marginata_(14217590519).jpg


https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Elysia_marginata_(14217590519).jpg
https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)00047-6
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/green-chloroplasts-in-plant-cells-gm116864378-6143246
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/leaf-footed-cactus-bug-on-a-prickly-pear-cactus-gm1218469776-356053220
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/close-up-coreid-bug-on-plant-tree-on-nature-green-background-squash-bug-gm1135040766-301807999
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/golden-orb-spider-in-its-golden-colored-web-gm1144142561-307484993

I Support Black Mediocrity | Andre Williams | TEDxUTAustin

Andre, a senior studying International Business, supports Black mediocrity, and in his talk he tells us why we should too. Why must Black people have to be exceptional in our society for them to be respected or valued? Whether we look at the entertainment industry, criminal justice, education, and more, we see that far too often the ticket into being treated with humanity and decency is whiteness. He asks, “why can’t we just be?”
Andre Williams is a fourth year International Business student at the University of Texas at Austin. Throughout college, Andre has focused on utilizing his voice and platform to advocate for more equitable and inclusive policies both on campus and within surrounding areas.

In Spring of 2020, Andre worked as an opinion columnist for The Daily Texan, UT’s official student newspaper. Utilizing this platform, he discussed social issues: racial inequality, education equality, disability advocacy, voting responsibility, and grading policy. Last academic year, Andre served as Communication Director on a Project for Austin CARES, through UT’s Leadership and Ethics Institute, working on increasing mentorship recruitment for the Austin based organization which focuses on empowering Black youth.

Andre currently serves as Political Activism Co-Chair of UT’s NAACP, for the 2020-2021 school year, where he works alongside the rest of the executive board to organize and develop events and outreach efforts aimed at promoting increased education and political involvement of Black students at UT and in surrounding communities.

With a mind that is constantly questioning established institutions and practices, Andre has committed himself to getting into ‘good trouble,’ causing disruption when necessary to dismantle barriers to access and inequities that continue to plague society. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Shaping the World Through Children’s Television | Claire Liu | TEDxTufts

In her talk, Claire explores the impact of intentional diversity in her childhood and how it has shaped her experience working in the film and media industry. Claire Liu (she/her/hers) is a senior at Tufts double majoring in Child Study & Human Development and Classics, with a minor in Entrepreneurship. She’s excited to talk about diversity in children’s media and how it can build empathy, especially as we are in the midst of a racial reckoning. Currently, Claire works at GBH for the children’s department where she assists with the production of shows Arthur, Molly of Denali (the first nationally distributed children’s series with an Indigenous heroine!), and Pinkalicious and Peterrific. Her senior thesis and GBH project dives into how producers of children’s television go about intentionally and respectfully represent BIPOC groups through their shows and peripherals. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

The real-life superheroes helping Syrian refugees | Feras Fayyad

Visit http://TED.com/shapeyourfuture to watch more groundbreaking talks from the TED Fellows.

Society has a set of stories it tells itself about who refugees are and what they look like, says documentarian and TED Fellow Feras Fayyad. With his films, he’s on a mission to separate the facts about refugees from fiction, as a form of resistance — for himself, his daughter and the millions of other Syrian refugees across the world. A harrowing account, a quest to end injustice and a testament to the power of storytelling.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know.

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Companies Losing 100’s of Billions – Global Chip Shortage

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Sources:

Semiconductor Shortage Enters ‘Danger Zone’ as Lead Times Rise

https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-the-chip-shortage-is-so-hard-to-overcome-11618844905

https://www.datacenterdynamics.com/en/news/biden-signs-executive-order-100-day-review-semiconductor-shortage-says-he-will-push-37bn-funding/

https://www.datacenterdynamics.com/en/news/tsmc-orders-water-truckload-keep-chip-production-going-during-growing-drought/

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/16/2-charts-show-how-much-the-world-depends-on-taiwan-for-semiconductors.html#:~:text=TSMC%20is%20the%20world’s%20largest%20semiconductor%20foundry.&text=war%20with%20China.-,Taiwan%20dominates%20the%20foundry%20market%2C%20or%20the%20outsourcing%20of%20semiconductor,Taipei%2Dbased%20research%20firm%20TrendForce.

https://www.scmp.com/tech/tech-trends/article/3132813/semiconductor-shortage-sees-chinas-carmakers-chip-suppliers-join

https://www.zdnet.com/article/the-global-chip-shortage-is-a-bigger-problem-than-everyone-realised-and-it-will-go-on-for-longer-too/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3csz8p0

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2021/05/22/business/chip-shortage-japanese-automakers/

Semiconductor Shortage Impact Extends Beyond Automotive

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56798308

Why We Can’t Build Our Way Out of the Semiconductor Shortage

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Sleepy Fish – Forgot It Was Monday (Original Mix)

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Why healthy bones are about so much more than milk | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

Drinking calcium-rich milk strengthens your bones — but it’s not the only thing you can do for a strong and healthy skeleton. Dr. Jen Gunter digs deep into the three layers of bone to explain why they weaken as we age and shares what you can do to maintain a healthy frame for years to come.

Think you know how your body works? Think again! Dr. Jen Gunter is here to shake up everything you thought you knew — from how much water you need to drink to how often you need to poop and everything in between. This TED original series will tell you the truth about what’s *really* going on inside you. (Made possible with the support of Oura)

Want to hear more from Dr. Jen Gunter? Follow Body Stuff on Apple Podcasts: https://link.chtbl.com/BodyStuffYT

What really happens to your body during menopause | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

It’s time to erase the shame and fear swirling around menopause and understand exactly what’s going on inside your body. Dr. Jen Gunter walks through the biology of this perfectly normal transition and shares some of the best things you can do — and not do — to reduce the varied and irksome symptoms of menopause.

Think you know how your body works? Think again! Dr. Jen Gunter is here to shake up everything you thought you knew — from how much water you need to drink to how often you need to poop and everything in between. This TED original series will tell you the truth about what’s *really* going on inside you. (Made possible with the support of Oura)

Want to hear more from Dr. Jen Gunter? Follow Body Stuff on Apple Podcasts: https://link.chtbl.com/BodyStuffYT

Universal basic income is a brilliant idea’. Here’s why. | Yanis Varoufakis | Big Think

Universal basic income is a brilliant idea’. Here’s why. | Yanis Varoufakis
Watch the newest video from Big Think: https://bigth.ink/NewVideo
Join Big Think Edge for exclusive videos: https://bigth.ink/Edge
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The welfare state is an ineffective and expensive system that hurts and targets the poor more than it helps. Universal basic income is a better alternative that could work.

The question becomes, then, where would the money for UBI come from? There are a myriad of reasons why UBI via taxes would be a bad idea. Instead, we should look to socially produced capital.

Companies rely on people to be successful, so a percentage of all shares of all companies should go into a public equity trust and the dividends should be distributed to every member of society equally.
———————————————————————————-
YANIS VAROUFAKIS:

Yanis Varoufakis is the former finance minister of Greece and the cofounder of an international grassroots movement, DiEM25, that is campaigning for the revival of democracy in Europe. He is the author of And the Weak Suffer What They Must? and The Global Minotaur. After teaching for many years in the United States, Britain, and Australia, he is currently a professor of economics at the University of Athens. His most recent books are Talking to My Daughter About the Economy and Adults in the Room.

Check Adults in the Room: My Battle with the European and American Deep Establishment at https://amzn.to/2UzNNo6
———————————————————————————-
TRANSCRIPT:

“YANIS VAROUFAKIS: Universal basic income is a brilliant idea, especially in view of the failures of the welfare state. If you look at the welfare state now it is grown in to a kind of securitized, weaponized system against the poor. It is a system for humiliating the poor, for putting them through various hoops to prove that they are deserving poor. It’s a very expensive system both in terms of the emotional effect that it has on the people that have to prove that they deserve benefits and also in terms of the actual economics of it. So the idea that everybody should have an income independently of whether they’re rich or poor that comes from the collective. And then that can be the basis for them to unfold their talents and creativity without having to do demeaning work.

This is a great idea. The question is where is this income going to come from. I personally believe it should come from taxation and it should come from taxation for a number of reasons, one of them being political.
If you take, for instance, a blue collar worker that struggles all day in a factory or on a shop floor or working for Amazon, whatever, and you tell him – usually but it could be a her – that another person will be sitting on the couch watching television being supported by the state to do this you are creating a huge political clash there within the working class. So I’m against that. But if you say to the population independent of which social class they belong to that these days capital is socially produced – capital goods. Take for instance the stock, the capital stock of Google. To a large extent it is produced by all of us every time we search something on the Google search engine. We are adding to the capital stock of Google. This is not just a consumer transaction. So if capital is socially produced why are the returns to capital privatized? On what basis? To cut a long story short my proposal has been for a number of years now what we call a universal basic dividend. So I believe that a percentage of all shares – shares of all companies – should go into a public equity trust like a wealth fund for society and the dividends should be distributed to every member of society equally. So a universal basic income but the income comes from returns to capital, not from taxation.

Whether you agree with this universal basic dividend proposal or not it is clear to me, at least to me, that we need global governance. Take free trade. If you are going to have free trade and I do believe that we need free trade. I’m not in favor of erecting border fences and stopping people from selling their ways into our countries. If you’re gong to have free trade you better have it along with regulations that make sure that there’s no social dumping. So my advice, for instance, for somebody who agrees with Donald Trump against NAFTA is well you want to renegotiate NAFTA, renegotiate it but not in order to reduce tariffs but in order to say to Mexico if you want to continue as part of NAFTA you’re going to have to pay a living wage to Mexican workers. So yes, I’m all in favor of global governance and in that context universal basic dividend could work and it could work quite nicely actually.”

People power: A message to the G7 | RSA Events

As nation-states grapple with generation-defining issues from the Covid-19 pandemic to the climate crisis, what role does civil society play in addressing the issues of our time?

For the first time since President Biden took office and the UK left the EU, the G7 countries will come together at the 2021 summit in England to discuss the pandemic, prosperity, climate change, and shared values. But without support, solidarity, and citizen engagement, these ambitions for a better world will come to nothing. Activism and political movement-building has always played a key role in democracies around the world – and in an age of crisis, we need people-powered change more than ever. How can grassroots mobilisation drive progress alongside more formal political processes?

On the eve of the 2021 G7 summit, Anthony Painter and Leah Greenberg explore the role of progressive political movements as engines of change during the 2020s.

This event is co-hosted by the RSA and Das Progressive Zentrum, as part of the 2021 Progressive Governance Digital Summit.

#RSAcivilsociety 

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We don’t know what a tree is (and this video won’t tell you)

Offset your carbon footprint with Wren! They’ll protect 5 extra acres of rainforest for each of the first 100 people who sign up at https://www.wren.co/join/minuteearth.
It turns out that defining what is and isn’t a “tree” is way harder than it seems.

LEARN MORE
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To learn more about this topic, start your googling with these keywords:
Wood: A bunch of cellulose fibers intertwined with lignin usually found in the trunk of a tree.
Trunk: A wooden stem that thickens over time.
Bonsai: An ornamental tree or shrub that is artificially prevented from reaching its normal size.
Shrub: A woody plant that is smaller than a tree.
Gymnosperm: A group of plants, including conifers, that have naked seeds.
Angiosperm: A group of plants, including lots of other “trees” that have enclosed seeds.
Monocots: A group of flowering plants – mostly angiosperms – with a single embryonic leaf that includes palm trees.
Dicots: A group of flowering plants – mostly angiosperms – with two embryonic leaves that includes oak trees.

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REFERENCES
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Georg Miehe, Sabine Miehe, Jonas Vogel, Sonam Co, Duo La. (2007) “Highest Treeline in the Northern Hemisphere Found in Southern Tibet,” Mountain Research and Development, 27(2), 169-173. Retrieved from: https://bioone.org/journals/mountain-research-and-development/volume-27/issue-2/mrd.0792/Highest-Treeline-in-the-Northern-Hemisphere-Found-in-Southern-Tibet/10.1659/mrd.0792.full#i0276-4741-27-2-169-b33

Ellenberg, H., Mueller-Dombois, D. (1965). A key to Raunkiaer plant life forms with revised subdivisions. Retrieved from: https://www.e-periodica.ch/cntmng?pid=bgi-002%3A1965%3A37%3A%3A130

Alcott, D. (2019). Are palm trees really trees? That’s Life Science. Retrieved from: http://thatslifesci.com/2019-11-25-Are-palm-trees-really-trees-dalcott/

David B. Neale, Pedro J. Martínez-García, Amanda R. De La Torre, Sara Montanari, Xiao-Xin Wei. (2017). “Novel Insights into Tree Biology and Genome Evolution as Revealed Through Genomics.” Annual Review of Plant Biology 68:1, 457-483. Retrieved from: https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-arplant-042916-041049?journalCode=arplant

Ehrenberg, Rachel. (2018). “What Makes A Tree A Tree?” Knowable Magazine. Retrieved from: https://knowablemagazine.org/article/living-world/2018/what-makes-tree-tree#:~:text=A%20banana%20tree%27s%20trunk%20doesn,cells%20typical%20of%20most%20trees

Christophe Plomion, Grégoire Leprovost, Alexia Stokes. (2001). “Wood Formation in Trees”. Plant Physiology, Volume 127, 4: 1513–1523. Retrieved from: https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.010816

The school curriculum has stopped breathing. Let’s bring it back to life. | Heidi Hayes Jacobs

The school curriculum has stopped breathing. Let’s bring it back to life.
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The role of curriculum planners is to ensure that what students are being taught doesn’t become stale and rigid. “The minute curriculum stops breathing, it gets really boring fast,” says Heidi Hayes Jacobs, president of Curriculum Designers Inc.

Jacobs says there are three necessary questions that designers have to ask while moving forward during and after COVID-19: What should be cut that isn’t working, what essential components should be kept, and maybe most importantly, what will be created?

Students, through their shared experiences, feelings, and realizations, will be a key part of how we understand this moment and use these insights to refresh learning.
———————————————————————————-
HEIDI HAYS JACOBS:

Dr. Heidi Hayes Jacobs is internationally recognized for her seminal work in contemporary curriculum design and modernizing responsive school environments. She works with a wide array of organizations, schools, districts, and software companies throughout the world. The author of thirteen books including the best-selling Bold Moves for Schools: How We Create Remarkable Learning Environments (ASCD) with co-author, Marie Alcock. Dr. Jacobs is fully engaged in how professionals, learners, and families can make choices to best prepare students for the future. You can visit her recently launched website in response to the COVID19 crisis at transform.curriculum21.com and follow her on Twitter @heidihayesjacob
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TRANSCRIPT:

HEIDI HAYES JACOBS: Curriculum, which in Latin means a path to run in small steps, people plan curriculum and it can be calcified, it can get rigid and the minute curriculum stops breathing it gets really boring, fast.

My life’s work has been really trying to assist wherever and in any way that I can in keeping it fresh and responsive to whomever the learners are. It’s somebody’s real path—it’s Maria’s and Johnny’s and Abdul’s real learning experiences we’re laying out there and we want to make sure they’re highly responsive.

So, the three questions that I think have to constantly be asked are really these and they’re very practical, but they’re powerful. One of them is, as we plan—whether it’s right now in the midst of COVID-19 or it’s post-pandemic—what do we cut? What is antiquated and unnecessary, trivial, nonessential or dated or maybe it’s actually pretty worthwhile and we’re just kind of set it in the back backstage, but we have to make some cuts? What are we going to keep that’s important, that’s classic, that works, that we really are invested in for our learners? But here’s the big one: What are we going to create? What are we going to create for our learners as we lay out learning experiences? And, to me, this is a big one because right now we are probably going to continue to have less formal contact time with students in person onsite for a while and we’re going to be doing a lot more online and we can’t just jam up the airwaves with lots of busy work, which is really tempting because the more we do that the more the attrition rate is going to grow where students are less engaged. So, we’re going to have to be very mindful about what to cut and keep, but I also think we’re going to be looking at what do we create.

And looking ahead I think one of the things we want to start to think about are actually designing and co-creating with learners some investigations where we have them document their learning, what they’re learning now, what they’ve learned through the course of this experience, what they’ve missed, what saddens them, what were maybe some surprises. I think they should actually, depending on the age group of the kids, study what’s going on with COVID. The importance of science has emerged so much for all of us but also competing views of what actions should be taken. We look at the global response we can totally see this as a full enter if not transdisciplinary opportunity for investigating what’s going on and to express what it is they need to be better at doing.

We will get through this and there will be a lot that we learn. I think one of the great opportunities here is to actually not just share what we’re experiencing but to sit back and we should genuinely listen to one another. So, I would ask teachers to listen to their learners and the parents, I would ask parents to listen to the stresses the teachers have felt, their learners and the learners to listen to one another as well as all involved and let’s show courage. Thank you.

A new approach to curriculum and assessment? | RSA Events

Rethinking Education Debate II: A new approach to curriculum and assessment?

In ordinary times, our exam system ensures that a third of young people finish school without the qualifications they need to progress. Now, after two years of cancelled exams, public dismay at algorithmic blindness to the true nature of student achievement, and after millions of the most disadvantaged children have missed out on key learning milestones, there has never been a more critical time to question our approach to assessment.  

The questions reach deeper than addressing the unfairness of the exam system, however. With Covid-19 sparking a youth unemployment crisis and social mobility grinding to a halt, do the events of 2020-21 force a fundamental rethink of the capabilities on which school curriculum and assessment should focus? 

Join us for a new series of Rethinking Education events, bringing together respected practitioners, policymakers and thinkers, to discuss whether the challenges that emerged during the Covid-19 crisis might, in fact, be opportunities to build consensus across political divides and different traditions in teaching and learning.  

Each event in the series focuses on one of the key moments of crisis for education during the pandemic, through the lens of either Creativity, Capability or Community – the three pillars of the RSA’s new education programme examining how we can build a more equitable and inclusive education system.

#RSAeducation

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The (Slow) Crisis Of Space Junk

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While recent news about the Chinese Long March 5 Rocket made a lot of people very nervous because a 22-ton rocket was going to fall out of the sky, this sort of thing happens all the time. Boosters, dead satellites, and sometimes even old space stations get dropped out of the sky fairly often. While the litter seems a little inconsiderate, this is probably far safer than the alternative. The accumulation of space junk poses a huge risk to all human operations in space especially if we cross the threshold into the chain reaction of exponentially growing collisions known as the Kessler Syndrome.

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Why You Always Have Room for Dessert, and Other Common Experiences Explained | Compilation

Did you know we have a whole channel dedicated to the human mind, people and interactions between people? It’s called SciShow Psych! And here is a compilation of five videos from that channel explaining some common experiences you may have wondered about before.

Hosted by: Hank Green

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Sources:

https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/excited-asian-woman-eating-ice-cream-on-the-street-emotional-hipster-holding-tasty-gm1319454234-406317244

Be Bold: Live Your Dream Life | Mandy Chan | TEDxPCC

Everybody has a dream project or ambition they want to pursue – the question is, how do you start? Mandy Chan, CEO and Co-Founder of The Bold Company, explores the mindset that led her to become an entrepreneur at the age of 19 and how anyone can apply it to their own personal and professional lives. As CEO and Co-Founder of The Bold Company (previously named BOW), she has built a S$2.5 million athleisure brand that has shipped more than 20,000 backpacks to over 26 countries at only 24 years of age through the power of crowdfunding. All of this was achieved through taking a gap year to create her own business from the ground up right before college. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Virtual Reality: The Future of our Heritage | Ajit Padmanabh | TEDxNITTrichy

Mr. Ajit Padmanabh, Founder & CEO of WhoVR, a startup focused on crafting heritage experiences through the use of cutting-edge VR, explains how the wonders of the ancient world can be reanimated through the power of virtual reality. From VR-enabled tours of inaccessible temples to reliving the majesty of ancient ruins in their heyday, this talk explores the sheer power of leveraging the modern to understand and get awed by the ancient. It aims to challenge the grand narratives of history on a global scale while fostering a deep-rooted sense of belonging in our heritage. Technology for good – technology to unite and inspire.

Founder at Who VR. He has a passion for our heritage, arts, culture, and the role of technology in rekindling interest in the same, challenging the grand narratives of history. His mission is to harness the cutting-edge for good – to make us veritable stakeholders of what is rightfully ours, but so often overlooked. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Why you shouldn’t worry about pooping once a day | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

You may have heard that you should be pooping once a day — but that’s a load of crap, says Dr. Jen Gunter. From the enzymes in your mouth to the nutrient-absorbing power of your large intestine, she journeys through the digestive tract to explain why it’s okay to poop at your own pace — and shares the many regulating benefits of a fiber-rich diet.

Think you know how your body works? Think again! Dr. Jen Gunter is here to shake up everything you thought you knew — from how much water you need to drink to how often you need to poop and everything in between. This TED original series will tell you the truth about what’s *really* going on inside you. (Made possible with the support of Oura)

Want to hear more? Follow Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter on Apple Podcasts: https://link.chtbl.com/BodyStuffYT

Why you don’t need 8 glasses of water a day | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

You know the old rule that you need to drink eight glasses of water every day? It’s simply a myth, says Dr. Jen Gunter. In this episode, she explains the amazing way your kidneys keep your system in balance — and how you can really tell if you’re dehydrated.

Think you know how your body works? Think again! Dr. Jen Gunter is here to shake up everything you thought you knew — from how much water you need to drink to how often you need to poop and everything in between. This TED original series will tell you the truth about what’s *really* going on inside you. (Made possible with the support of Oura)

Want to hear more? Follow Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter on Apple Podcasts: https://link.chtbl.com/BodyStuffYT

Misconceptions About The Renaissance

The Renaissance gave us the Mona Lisa, the telescope, and the Sistine Chapel. But who is the Mona Lisa actually a painting of? And did Galileo really invent the telescope? And be honest, do you picture Michelangelo painting the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel… on his back? We’ve got some centuries-old myths to debunk, let’s get started.

Let’s reshape how we think about this important cultural movement. Join host Justin Dodd in an endless pursuit of the truth.

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A feminist reimagining of Kenya’s public transport | Naomi Mwaura

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Kenya’s minibuses — known as “matatus” — offer a convenient, affordable and colorful way for people to get around. But they also pose safety risks and accessibility issues for many of their passengers, especially women. Bringing a feminist perspective, activist and TED Fellow Naomi Mwaura calls for a revolution in public transportation by making routes transparent, protecting passengers from harassment and paving a career path for women in the industry.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know.

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What Are the Long-Term Effects of COVID-19?

Many people want to avoid contracting COVID, not just because of the immediate effects of the disease, but also because of the way those effects can linger. But how exactly can COVID affect different parts of your body—including your brain—even after you test negative?

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SARS-CoV-2 (which is the virus that causes COVID-19) enters your cells using a receptor called ACE-2, which is a surface protein that tons of our cells have, especially the epithelial ones. Epithelial cells line our organs and our blood vessels…they’re a HUGE part of our body.

ACE-2 is essentially like a doorknob, and it’s how the virus lets itself into our cells. And this is crucial to how COVID can make us so sick in so many different ways and potentially for so long.

And because the virus binds to ACE-2, and ACE-2 is all over your epithelial cells, and those epithelial cells are all over your body, the virus can cause this chaos everywhere, and that chaos doesn’t just go away.

#covid #covid-19 #covid19 #longcovid #longhaulers #science #seeker #elements

Read More:

Nearly One-Third of Covid-19 Survivors Have Symptoms, Some Up To 9 Months Later, New Study Finds
https://www.forbes.com/sites/robertglatter/2021/02/20/nearly-one-third-of-covid-19-survivors-have-symptoms-some-up-to-9-months-later-new-study-finds/
“Of the 177 mostly outpatients (90% never admitted to the hospital), researchers found that the most common chronic symptoms were fatigue (24/177 patients) and loss of smell or taste (24/177 patients). Four patients (2.3%) also reported brain fog, among 23 patients (13%) reporting other symptoms.”

Long COVID Alliance Launched to Help Coronavirus ‘Long Haulers’
https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/clinical-care/long-covid-alliance-launched-help-coronavirus-long-haulers
“More than 50 organizations have formed the Long COVID Alliance to use their collective knowledge and resources to educate policymakers, accelerate research, and empower patients.”

‘Long COVID’ Study Will Examine Vaccines’ Effect on Patient Symptoms
https://www.hhmi.org/news/long-covid-study-will-examine-vaccines-effect-on-patient-symptoms
“A new study is currently enrolling people with long COVID who have not yet been vaccinated. The work could tell researchers what’s driving the condition and offer clues to treatment.”
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Seeker empowers the curious to understand the science shaping our world. We tell award-winning stories about the natural forces and groundbreaking innovations that impact our lives, our planet, and our universe.

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Bitcoin and blockchain 101: Why the future will be decentralized | Big Think

Bitcoin and blockchain 101: Why the future will be decentralized
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We’ve all heard terms like Bitcoin, blockchain, and cryptocurrency being thrown around in the past few years, but what do they mean? Consider this your crash course.

Experts from across the spectrum of money and tech provide a history of commerce dating back tens of thousands of years, explain what blockchain and Bitcoin are and how they work, and offer insights into the differences between centralized and decentralized systems.

Because blockchain is incredibly difficult to hack, it has massive implications for elections, banking, shipping, land ownership—any domain where corruption is rampant. While the technology may feel abstract now, programmer Brian Behlendorf compares it to explaining the concept of email to people in 1993. One day, blockchain will be a seamless part of our lives.

Check Tony Saldanha’s book “Why Digital Transformations Fail: The Surprising Disciplines of How to Take Off and Stay Ahead” at https://amzn.to/36iaOCH
———————————————————————————-
TRANSCRIPT:

WENCES CASARES: It’s hard to have a rigorous discussion about Bitcoin without understanding money. And the best way to understand money, is to understand the history of money. Anthropologists agree that there is no tribe, much less a civilization, that ever based its commerce on barter. There’s no evidence, barter never happened. And that’s counter intuitive to most of us, because we are taught in school, that we first bartered and then we made money because barter was too complicated. Well, barter never happened, and that’s one of the key sort of myths about money. So then, you would ask the anthropologists like, okay so how did we do commerce before money, if there was no barter? There was no commerce? No, there was plenty of commerce. And the way that commerce would happen is that, let’s say that someone in our tribe had killed a big buffalo and I would go up to a person and say, “Hey, can I have a little bit of meat?” And that person would say, “no,” or “Yes, Wences, here’s your meat.” And then, you would go up to the person and say, “Hey, can I have a little bit of meat?” And that person would say “Yes, here’s your meat.” And basically, we all had to keep track, in our heads, of what we owed other people, or what other people owed us. And then someone would come to me and say, “hey, Wences, can I have a little bit of firewood?” And I would say, “Sure, here’s your firewood.” And now, I have to remember that I owe that person a little bit, that this person owes me a little. And we all went around about our business, with these ledgers in our minds of who owes us what, and what do we owe to whom. Very subjective system.

Often, these debts didn’t clear, or cleared in ways that were not satisfactory to both parties, until about 25,000 years ago. Someone very, very intelligent, came up with a new technology that really took off, which they came to me and said, “Hey, can I have a little bit of firewood?” And I said, “Sure, here’s your firewood.” And this person said, “This time, we’re gonna try something different. Here are some beads for you.” And I said, “I don’t want beads, I don’t care for beads, I don’t need beads.” He said, “It’s not about that. We’re gonna use beads, as the objective ledger of our tribe. Instead of each of us having to remember what we’re owed, the beads are gonna keep track for us, an objective ledger to keep track of debts.” And it was such a successful technology that it took off. And in a couple thousand years, it became impossible to find a tribe or civilization that didn’t have some form of objective ledger. In some cases it was one point shells. In other places, it was salt, in other places, rocks or beads. But, this form of keeping track of debts, with an objective ledger took off, and anthropologists go as far as saying that, if you describe a tribe’s environment in detail, they can predict what’s going to emerge as an objective ledger, as money. Because it’s always something that has six qualities, the most important of which, is that it be scarce. And it makes sense, because if it’s not scarce, we can create, you know, if we were to use tree leaves, for example, we could create debts that are owed to us out of thin air, and that wouldn’t be good, that wouldn’t be a good ledger. But also has to be durable. If it’s something that decays or corrodes, it doesn’t store the information well. It has to be divisible. It has to be transportable, recognizable, and fungible.

And this system really worked until about, 5,000 years ago, when trade began to extend a lot geographica…

Read the full transcript at https://bigthink.com/videos/what-is-bitcoin-blockchain

Everest Doesn’t Always Feel Like the Tallest Mountain

Mt Everest is unquestionably the highest point on earth, but it doesn’t always feel that way.

Hosted by: Rose Bear Don’t Walk

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Sources:
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2020.101718
https://doi.org/10.1029/2020EO152830
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4175264/
https://www.npl.co.uk/resources/q-a/atmospheric-altitude-pressure-changes
http://www.meteo.psu.edu/wjs1/Meteo3/Html/pressure.htm

Images:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mount_Everest_as_seen_from_Drukair2_PLW_edit.jpg

Ugly History: The U.S. Syphilis Experiment – Susan M. Reverby

Dig into the unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Study, which spanned 40 years and lied to its participants about receiving treatment for syphilis.

Afflicting nearly 1 in 10 Americans, syphilis was ravaging the U.S. in the 1930s. Many doctors believed syphilis affected Black and white patients differently, and the Public Health Service launched an experiment to investigate, recruiting 600 Black men to take part. But the study was centered on a lie: the men wouldn’t actually receive treatment. Susan Reverby details the Tuskegee Syphilis Study.

Lesson by Susan M. Reverby, directed by Ouros Animation.

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Animator’s website: https://www.ouros.net
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3 scientists school flat Earthers on the evidence | Neil deGrasse Tyson, Bill Nye, Michelle Thaller

3 scientists school flat Earthers on the evidence
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Despite centuries of evidence proving otherwise, there is an alarming number of people around the world who genuinely believe that the earth is flat. Bill Nye The Science Guy, NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller, and Neil deGrasse Tyson strongly disagree.

From simple experiments like standing at a seashore or looking through a telescope at other planets, to reading about navigation or viewing photos of Earth taken from space, the scientists share several ways that flat Earthers can see the truth for themselves.

Tyson explains why this trend doesn’t qualify as a scientific debate and why it is actually dangerous for people to believe and, even worse, pass on these objectively false ideas.
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NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON:

Neil deGrasse Tyson was born and raised in New York City where he was educated in the public schools clear through his graduation from the Bronx High School of Science. Tyson went on to earn his BA in Physics from Harvard and his PhD in Astrophysics from Columbia. He is the first occupant of the Frederick P. Rose Directorship of the Hayden Planetarium. His professional research interests are broad, but include star formation, exploding stars, dwarf galaxies, and the structure of our Milky Way. Tyson obtains his data from the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as from telescopes in California, New Mexico, Arizona, and in the Andes Mountains of Chile.Tyson is the recipient of nine honorary doctorates and the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. His contributions to the public appreciation of the cosmos have been recognized by the International Astronomical Union in their official naming of asteroid “13123 Tyson”.
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BILL NYE:

Bill Nye, scientist, engineer, comedian, author, and inventor, is a man with a mission: to help foster a scientifically literate society, to help people everywhere understand and appreciate the science that makes our world work. Making science entertaining and accessible is something Bill has been doing most of his life.

In Seattle Nye began to combine his love of science with his flair for comedy, when he won the Steve Martin look-alike contest and developed dual careers as an engineer by day and a stand-up comic by night. Nye then quit his day engineering day job and made the transition to a night job as a comedy writer and performer on Seattle’s home-grown ensemble comedy show “Almost Live.” This is where “Bill Nye the Science Guy®” was born. The show appeared before Saturday Night Live and later on Comedy Central, originating at KING-TV, Seattle’s NBC affiliate.

Nye is the host of three currently-running television series. “The 100 Greatest Discoveries” airs on the Science Channel. “The Eyes of Nye” airs on PBS stations across the country.
Bill’s latest project is hosting a show on Planet Green called “Stuff Happens.” It’s about environmentally responsible choices that consumers can make as they go about their day and their shopping. Also, you’ll see Nye in his good-natured rivalry with his neighbor Ed Begley. They compete to see who can save the most energy and produce the smallest carbon footprint. Nye has 4,000 watts of solar power and a solar-boosted hot water system. There’s also the low water use garden and underground watering system. It’s fun for him; he’s an engineer with an energy conservation hobby.
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MICHELLE THALLER:

Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/1040/michelle-thaller/
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TRANSCRIPT:

BILL NYE: Is the earth flat or round? It’s round, okay. Now, let’s see. How do we go about proving that?

MICHELLE THALLER: That’s a hard thing for me to even start talking about because there are so many proofs that the earth is round it’s difficult…

Read the full transcript at https://bigthink.com/videos/flat-earth-myth-bust

I found a Mud Volcano in California

Subscribe for more physics, science and curious phenomena.
Why are there holes all over the southern California desert? This area is a unique basin that should actually be 20,000 ft below sea level. So I traveled there and spent 4 hrs looking for muddy holes in the ground.

The moving mud puddle:

Link:
topographicmap.com

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Vaccinarci per il Covid? Perché e cosa ci aspetta | Giuseppe Remuzzi | TEDxLegnano

Come avremmo affrontato la pandemia se ci avesse colpiti solo 20 anni fa? E quali sono state le risposte della scienza per combattere il Covid-19?

Il professor Giuseppe Remuzzi, direttore dell’Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, ci spiega perché la ricerca è andata oltre ogni più ottimistico limite. Dal lavoro solerte dei medici di tutto il mondo alle innovazioni in campo terapeutico, fino ai tempi sinora inimmaginabili per ottenere vaccini sicuri ed efficaci. Un viaggio globale per capire che il benessere di ciascuno dipende dal benessere di tutti, con la sempre maggior consapevolezza che la salute umana, degli animali e della Terra sono connesse indissolubilmente. E poiché la nostra libertà dipende dalla salute dagli altri, l’unica soluzione possibile è vaccinare l’intero Pianeta. Fa parte della Consulta Tecnica Permanente per i Trapianti e della Commissione “Ricerca e Innovazione” del Ministero della Salute ed è membro del Consiglio Superiore di Sanità.
È l’unico italiano ad essere membro del Comitato di redazione delle riviste “The Lancet” e “New England Journal of Medicine” (1998-2013 giugno).
Le sue ricerche hanno permesso di aumentare il numero dei trapiantati. Gli studi più recenti riguardano la possibilità di rigenerare i tessuti e creare organi in laboratorio utilizzando cellule staminali. Ha creato il progetto globale ISN “0 by 25”: entro il 2025 nessuna morte di forme curabili di insufficienza renale acuta. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

How to be fearless? | Dr. Gurjot Kaur | TEDxShooliniUniversity

Dr. Gurjot Kaur is working as an Associate Professor at the School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shoolini University. She is a toxicologist by training, and an environmentalist by passion. She is currently working at Shoolini University and holds a Post-Doctorate from the University of Konstanz, Germany. While she is passionate about many things in life including children and education, she realizes that how fewer people know about joy as well as the woes of being a scientist. She is actively involved in leadership roles in the Society of Toxicology and loves to blog about science. In this powerful talk, she highlights her idea of being fearless in life. Gurjot believes that fearlessness is one trait that has really shaped her to embrace her best self. She beautifully depicts her mantra of fearlessness through the ‘fearlessness pyramid’. Dr. Gurjot Kaur is working as an Associate Professor at the School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shoolini University. She is a toxicologist by training, and an environmentalist by passion. She is currently working at Shoolini University and holds a Post-Doctorate from the University of Konstanz, Germany. While she is passionate about many things in life including children and education, she realizes that how fewer people know about joy as well as the woes of being a scientist. She is actively involved in leadership roles in the Society of Toxicology and loves to blog about science. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

CREEPYPASTA – The Ancient Dead

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