The power of Moore’s law: Predicting the future | Michio Kaku

Throughout this episode, you will know about the power of Moore’s law. Moore’s law attempts to predict the future of silicon chips.

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Welcome to the “Big Think” YouTube channel. Moore’s Law has been around since 1965 when Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore described it in a paper. Since that day, the law has been in full effect, and the number of transistors placed inexpensively on an integrated circuit has roughly doubled every two years. It’s also a commonly held belief that chip performance doubles every 18 months.

But Moore’s Law won’t be true forever, and in the video below theoretical physicist, Michio Kaku explains how it will collapse. And Kaku argues that the collapse isn’t going to happen in some distant future but within the next decade. The problem is one of finding a replacement for silicon coupled with the exponential nature of Moore’s Law. Quite simply, computing power cannot go on doubling every two years indefinitely.

The other issue is we are about to reach the limits of silicon. According to Kaku, once we get done to 5nm processes for chip production, silicon is finished. Any smaller and processors will just overheat. What’s beyond silicon? There have been a number of proposals: protein computers, DNA computers, optical computers, quantum computers, molecular computers. Dr. Michio Kaku says “if I were to put money on the table I would say that in the next ten years as Moore’s Law slows down, we will tweak it.”

So, what do you think?

Is Michio Kaku right or is he going to be just one among many who wrongly predicted the demise of Moore’s Law?!

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KEYWORDS:
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The Growing Maker Culture | Aarav Garg | Aarav Garg | TEDxChennaiInstituteOfTechnology

Aarav is 15 years old. He is an innovator. He uses technology and makes things ranging from complex robots to a simple pocket weather station. Many of his projects have been published in prominent international magazines. He also makes tutorials on his creations so that anyone can make them. Many students all around the world have built robots and other projects using his tutorials. He is the founder of Tech Nuttiez, a startup that aims to educate the youth globally on technology. He believes that he is a part of the growing ‘Maker Movement Aarav is 15 years old. He is an innovator. He uses technology and makes things ranging from complex robots to a simple pocket weather station. Many of his projects have been published in prominent international magazines. He also makes tutorials on his creations so that anyone can make them. Many students all around the world have built robots and other projects using his tutorials. He is the founder of Tech Nuttiez, a startup that aims to educate the youth globally on technology. He believes that he is a part of the growing ‘Maker Movement This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Steven Sharp Nelson: How to find peace with loss through music | TED

Music can act as a guide, says cellist Steven Sharp Nelson. It has the power to unlock the mind, tap into the heart and bring light in the darkest times. Take a deep breath as Nelson takes you on a melodic, meditative journey that could reconnect you with your closest loved ones — no matter how near or far they may be.

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The public toll road with no speed limit

The Nürburgring Nordschleife is the longest permanent racetrack in the world: 21km of unforgiving blind corners and hills, nicknamed “the Green Hell”. Oh, and some days, it’s also just a public toll road with no speed limit.

More about the Ring: https://www.nuerburgring.de/en.html
About “Touristenfahrten”, Tourist Drives: https://nuerburgring.de/driving/touristdrives

Driver: Andy Gülden
Camera: Moritz Janisch
Producer: Marcel Fenchel https://www.fenchel-janisch.com/
Location assistance: Misha Charoudin (who included me in his vlog from the day! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uu0VnfvKgKw )

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How America’s hottest city is trying to cool down

Can trees help save Phoenix from extreme heat?

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It’s time to stop looking at trees as a form of “beautification.” They are, instead, a living form of infrastructure, providing a variety of services that include stormwater management, air filtering, carbon sequestration, and, most importantly for a city like Phoenix, Arizona, they cool the environment around them.

Trees can lower neighborhood temperatures in three ways:
1) Their shade prevents solar radiation from hitting paved surfaces like concrete and asphalt, which absorb energy and rerelease it into the air as heat.
2) Their leaves pull heat from the immediate area in order to evapotranspirate water that’s drawn from the soil.
And, 3) If you’re standing under one, a tree protects your body directly from the sun’s rays. If you’ve ever made a summer visit to a dry, hot city like Phoenix, you’ll know how important shade is for making any outdoor experiences tolerable.

As Phoenix deals with a rising frequency of extreme heat waves — which aren’t only deadly, but also cause worrisome spikes in energy demand — the city is looking to trees as part of its heat mitigation strategy. Phoenix isn’t devoid of trees, but they’re distributed unevenly across the city. A quick glance at a satellite image of the metro area reveals substantial green splotches in the north and east and brown ones in the south and west, where many lower-income neighborhoods are located.

So Phoenix recently pledged to reach “tree equity” by 2030, under an agreement with American Forests, a national tree organization. I visited Phoenix recently to take a look at the current state of the city’s urban forest. In this video, we use drone imagery and thermal cameras to understand how the urban design of the city contributes to extreme heat, and what it can do to cool down.

Further reading:

Tree Equity Score Tool by American Forests https://treeequityscore.org

Assessment of heat mitigation strategies in Phoenix by Arizona State University https://www.phoenix.gov/parkssite/Documents/PKS_Forestry/PKS_Forestry_NOAA_PHX_Urban_Spaces_Report.pdf

Urban Heat Implications from Parking, Roads, and Cars https://par.nsf.gov/servlets/purl/10201112

“Phoenix pledges tree equity for all neighborhoods by 2030” by KJZZ https://kjzz.org/content/1677263/phoenix-pledges-tree-equity-all-neighborhoods-2030

Phoenix Draft Climate Action Plan: https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/cap

Phoenix tree bank https://www.phoenix.gov/sustainability/plantatree

“50 Grades of Shade” by Ariane Middel https://journals.ametsoc.org/view/journals/bams/aop/BAMS-D-20-0193.1/BAMS-D-20-0193.1.xml

“A New Investigation About Who’s Getting Sick From Heat-Related Illness Should Be a Wakeup Call for America” by Mother Jones https://www.motherjones.com/environment/2021/01/a-new-investigation-about-who-is-dying-from-heat-related-illness-should-be-a-wakeup-call-for-america/

“As rising heat bakes US cities, the poor often feel it most” by NPR https://www.npr.org/2019/09/03/754044732/as-rising-heat-bakes-u-s-cities-the-poor-often-feel-it-most?t=1628079007286

“Can trees really cool our cities down?” by The Conversation https://theconversation.com/can-trees-really-cool-our-cities-down-44099

“Trees are key to fighting urban heat, but cities keep losing them” by NPR https://www.npr.org/2019/09/04/755349748/trees-are-key-to-fighting-urban-heat-but-cities-keep-losing-them

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You’re Breathing in Microplastics, But What Does That Mean for Your Health?

Microplastics are everywhere—in our food, water, and now even the air we breathe. But scientists are just starting to understand how airborne microplastics end up in the atmosphere and what happens when we breathe them in.

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Let’s start with the basics. Microplastics are tiny specks of plastic less than 5 millimeters long—think anything shorter than the width of a pencil eraser. They come in two main categories.

The first type is known as primary, which are already small plastics, like glitter, and are directly released into the environment. The other type is secondary microplastics, which form when larger plastics degrade.

Most plastics are broken down through weathering, like when they’re exposed to waves, wind abrasion, and UV radiation. And depending on the type of plastic, it can take up to hundreds of years to break down, if at all.

And because microplastics are so tiny and lightweight, they can be transported over long distances globally. Eighty four percent of those microplastics likely originated from roads with the rest coming from oceans and agricultural dust.

Roads and the cars that drive on them provide the mechanical energy needed to make plastic airborne. As you’re racing down the highway, tiny bits of tire and other microplastics stuck to your tire slough off and fly away.

Think of it much like the way people move sand away from a beach, cars can move plastic away from cities, and then also move those plastics high into the atmosphere.

Limited research has also revealed that microplastics affect the health of plants and animals, which has impacts on the entire food chain.

#PlasticPollution #Sustainability #Technology #Science #Seeker #Elements

Read More:

Microplastics Are Now Spiralling Around The Globe in The Air We Breathe
https://www.sciencealert.com/microplastics-are-now-spiralling-around-the-globe-in-the-air-we-breathe
While the remote wilderness of Antarctica isn’t exporting any airborne microplastics, it’s very likely to be importing them, the model showed – and it’s a similar story across the planet. Microplastics are accumulating just about everywhere scientists look, including national parks, with the highest concentrations estimated to be over the oceans.

Are you breathing plastic air at home? Here’s how microplastics are polluting our lungs
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/06/microplastic-pollution-in-air-pollutes-our-lungs/
The majority of microplastics found in the indoor air, however, comes from plastic fibres released from synthetic clothing and textiles used in home furnishings. These microplastic fibres tend to be longer and therefore more harmful when inhaled. Today, synthetic materials, such as acrylic, nylon, polyester, make up some 60% of global textile production.

You’re Likely Inhaling 11 Tiny Bits of Plastic Per Hour
https://www.vice.com/en/article/xwnm74/youre-likely-inhaling-11-tiny-bits-of-plastic-per-hour
“We now have enough evidence that we should start looking for microplastic inside human airways,” Vollertsen said. “Until then, it’s unclear whether or not we should be worried that we are breathing in plastic.”
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Broods, Brains, and Blood: Where Won’t Parasites Go? | Compilation

Parasites. They’re all around us, from birds’ nests to litter boxes to our brains, and while plenty of them are harmful to the health of animals like us, some of them can actually be good!

Hosted by: Stefan Chin

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Original Episodes:
Human Parasites – https://youtu.be/ABeBqbBy2Lo
Brood Parasites – https://youtu.be/HpIhSLXQ5oc
Mind-controlling Parasites! – https://youtu.be/uvdiYg6ZN-U
Toxoplasmosis: How Parasites in Your Cat Can Infect Your Brain – https://youtu.be/FNm_MjrIUAI
Why Don’t Humans Get Heartworm? (Spoiler: We Do) – https://youtu.be/8ilHOgTXnp0
Why You Might Want Parasitic Worms – https://youtu.be/qD6fmHUXBEg

What is ESG investing? | John Fullerton | Big Think

What is ESG investing?
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ESG in investing stands for environmental, social and governance. It is a set of criteria investors can use to understand the values and the future of an organization.

Companies pour resources into disclosing their ESG because, as the saying goes, sunlight is the best disinfectant. Or so has been the thought for many years.

While ESG is undoubtedly good, says John Fullerton, mere transparency is not going to solve the world’s sustainability issues. For that, public companies need to act more like private companies and be responsible to their owners.
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JOHN FULLERTON:

John Fullerton is the founder and president of Capital Institute, a non-partisan organization working to create a more just and sustainable way of living on earth through the implementation of a Regenerative Economy.

After spending years immersed in the sustainability challenge of our age following his Wall Street career, John is now a globally-recognized thought leader in the New Economy space. The architect of the concept of Regenerative Capitalism, John is the author of Regenerative Capitalism: How Universal Principles and Patterns Will Shape the New Economy and the Future of Finance blog.

John Fullerton’s latest book A Finer Future: Creating an Economy in Service to Life at https://amzn.to/2V3CK8a
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TRANSCRIPT:

JOHN FULLERTON: The idea of ESG in investing—which stands for environmental, social and governance—has been around probably for 20 years now. It sort of followed the SRI movement—socially responsible investing—and this was our attempt to think beyond shareholder value and what other values matter to the health of a corporation in the long run. So ESG: environmental, the company’s environmental performance and behavior; social, the way it treats its employees, the way it treats its consumer, the way it behaves in its community, healthcare benefits that it gives that kind of thing; and G, governance, is the company well governed or not well governed? And they’re sort of common sense recognition that those attributes and those values are also important. It’s not just shareholder value, it’s a broader set of values. And there’s been probably billions of dollars invested in measuring and disclosing ESG factors by public corporations and of course more disclosure about these issues is definitely good. The old saying ‘sunshine is the best disinfectant’, so if companies are required to report on these things they’re going to manage them and that will be a positive outcome.

What that whole idea, though, failed to address is the thing I talked about earlier, which is that public companies that operate in public capital markets, whether they disclose everything perfectly or not, are sitting in a system where they’ve been separated, the relationship between their true owners has been separated by the capital markets or disintermediated by the capital markets. And their engagement with their direct owners may be once a year at the annual meeting in a proxy vote, but in a private company, for example, the owners of the company are on the boards of directors, their wealth is tied up in the company and they pay very close attention to the company. So I’d argue that we’ll never solve the unsustainability crisis in business simply through more transparency, ESG and otherwise. We need to use that data to manage businesses, but we also need to reconnected them fundamentally with the owners of enterprise.

And the thing about the principles of living systems is that they’re not kind of a menu you can pick and choose from; healthy living systems operate in accordance with all of them all at the same time, or a system gets sick and dies. You get cancer when at a cellular level you’re not communicating effectively. So ESG can be all well and good, but if we don’t also deal with the right relationship point it goes for naught and I wouldn’t at all suggest that the work in the ESG movement over the last 20 years has not been beneficial, but certainly even the most adamant champions of it had acknowledged that it hasn’t achieved the outcomes that they’d hoped. And it’s interesting that I now often get invited to an ESG conference because people in the ESG community recognize that there must be something more to it than the work that they’re working on. And I used to say are you sure they’re ready for my message because it’s not consistent with their worldview and that’s no longer a concern, people are hungry for fresh ways to think about things. So that’s progress.

How Do Ducks Stay Dry?

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You might be familiar with the phrase “like water off a ducks back”. But it’s not that ducks don’t get wet, it’s that they get wet, with style.

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Sources:
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/763343
https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.1c04480
https://www.tsfx.edu.au/resources/46606.pdf
https://news.mit.edu/2014/how-cormorants-emerge-dry-after-deep-dives-0616
http://naturevictoria.com/articles/buoyancy.html

IMAGES

https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/diving-mallard-gm183533292-14887154
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/closeup-feather-detail-of-mallard-duck-gm157611351-13529105
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/americans-male-mallard-duck-drake-on-the-lake-sylogx91vkckm6b9q

How to find a meaningful job, or find purpose in the job you already have | Aaron Hurst | Big Think

3 ways to find a meaningful job, or find purpose in the job you already have
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Broaching the question “What is my purpose?” is daunting – it’s a grandiose idea, but research can make it a little more approachable if work is where you find your meaning. It turns out you can redesign your job to have maximum purpose.

There are 3 ways people find meaning at work, what Aaron Hurst calls the three elevations of impact. About a third of the population finds meaning at an individual level, from seeing the direct impact of their work on other people. Another third of people find their purpose at an organizational level. And the last third of people find meaning at a social level.”

What’s interesting about these three elevations of impact is they enable us to find meaning in any job if we approach it the right way. And it shows how accessible purpose can be when we take responsibility for it in our work,” says Hurst.
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AARON HURST

Aaron Hurst is a globally recognized entrepreneur who works to create communities that are empowered to realize their potential. He is the CEO of Imperative, a B Corp advocating for Purpose-Oriented Workers and supporting the organizations that embrace them. Hurst is the author of The Purpose Economy (2014) and a regular advisor and thought partner for many global brands.
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TRANSCRIPT:

AARON HURST: There’s a lot of talk about purpose: What is your purpose as an individual? And, really, it puts a lot of pressure on us to figure out what is our purpose, a sort of grandiose idea. And it’s scary to enter that.

What we’ve found, actually, in studying individual purpose is that it’s much simpler than that, especially as you get started on that journey. And I just want to share with you one question for you to really reflect on to help you think about how to make purpose more accessible to you. What we’ve seen in our research is that we’re wired to find meaning in different ways at work. We don’t all get a sense of purpose from the same things. And that doesn’t mean different causes. It actually has to do with the elevation of meaning in your work. So let me explain what that means.

For about a third of the population, they get the most meaning at work when they can directly see their work impacting other people. They need to have that visceral sense that their work actually made an impact in someone’s life. No matter what the impact is, if they don’t see that visceral connection, they don’t feel a sense of purpose. Think of a doctor, right? A doctor sees patient after patient. If they didn’t get a sense of meaning from each patient, that job wouldn’t be fulfilling. It wouldn’t be one that they would find purpose in most likely. I think of myself. I actually asked my doctor once, you know, “How the hell do you listen to person after person come in with the same issue after the same issue? Don’t you just want to be like, look, I’ve already seen this one before. Go see another doctor. I’ve already treated this issue.” And he said, “No, actually, I see each person as like a unique opportunity to make an impact.” So for about a third of people, that is the primary lens for thinking about impact. And you don’t have to be a doctor to do that. There’s a lot of ways for that to show up. It could be your co-workers. It could be customers. It could be clients. There’s a lot of ways to think about how to make that direct impact.

We then have about a third of the workforce who gain much more meaning from working at an organizational level. They say, it’s great to help people, but, ultimately, I want to build a more sustainable impact by helping build teams, to build organizations, to build institutions that can make a longer, sustained impact on the world. And when I see, you know, helping a given patient, you know, that’s meaningful, but I’d rather help 1,000 doctors serve a million patients and be part of that equation, and that’s what’s really going to get me fired up. Whereas a person at that individual side might be like, “That that sounds like bureaucracy. Why would you want to be in medicine and be a hospital administrator? That sounds like torture.” But to the person who’s driven by that organizational change, that is exactly where they need to get that meaning. For people who really get a lot of meaning from that organizational team level, there’s so many ways to do that. But at the core, it’s about building teams, building organizations…

For the full transcript, check out: https://bigthink.com/videos/3-ways-to-find-a-meaningful-job-or-find-purpose-in-the-job-you-already-have

Bit Blit Algorithm (Amiga Blitter Chip) – Computerphile

The Bit Blit algorithm dates back to Xerox PARC, but was famously used to sell the Amiga home computer among others. Dr Steve Bagley takes us through how it works.

This is a re-upload due to an audio problem on the earlier edit -Sean

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This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley.

Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: https://bit.ly/nottscomputer

Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran’s Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com

Some Butterflies Are Secretly Cannibals

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In the insect world, there are few creatures as gentle and innocent as a butterfly. And yet, some butterflies have… an unexpected side to them.

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Sources:
Butterflies
https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ecy.3532

https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/928051
https://www.monarchwatch.org/milkweed/
https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/Monarch_Butterfly/habitat/

Cockatoos
https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)01111-8
https://www.science.org/content/article/wild-cockatoos-make-their-own-cutlery-sets
https://www.livescience.com/9761-10-animals-tools.html

Images:
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/monarch-butterfly-on-grass-szihec8
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/butterfly-2020-63-gm1300350419-392709146
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/brilliant-monarch-butterflies-soaring-in-the-air-gm1268037210-372132110
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/799547
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dark_Blue_Tiger_(Tirumala_septentrionis),_Striped_Blue_Crow_(Euploea_mulciber),_and_Common_Tiger_(Danaus_genutia).jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MATING_BUTTERFLIES.jpg
https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/799546
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:DSCN2817.JPG
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/monarch-butterfly-danaus-plexippus-gm90393202-1493221
https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)01111-8#relatedArticles
Young goffin's cockatoo
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cerbera_manghas-3-JNTBGRI-kerala-India.jpg
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/goffins-cockatoo-bird-standing-on-the-ram-stairs-gm1169638163-323400309
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/goffins-cockatoo-bird-standing-on-the-ram-stairs-gm1169638295-323400310
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/goffins-cockatoo-bird-standing-on-the-ram-stairs-gm1169638444-323400313
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/goffins-cockatoo-bird-standing-on-the-ram-stairs-gm1169638090-323400308

Will the Right to Protest survive its migration online? | Brett Solomon | TEDxByronBay

A tectonic shift is happening as the Right to Protest struggles to move online. State-sanctioned internet shutdowns, increased surveillance, and unequal access to the internet are impacting communities all over the world. Will the Right to Protest survive? And how will this impact our ability to secure all our rights, create a just and equitable society, and protect the environment?

Brett Solomon is an internationally renowned activist working at the intersection of human rights and the digital world. He is the Executive Director and co-founder of Access Now, a global non-profit organization that defends and extends the digital rights of users at risk around the world. By combining direct technical support, comprehensive policy engagement, global advocacy, grassroots grantmaking and legal action, the 100-strong organization fights for human rights in the digital age. Brett is also the founder of RightsCon, the world’s leading summit on human rights and in the digital age. Before Access Now, Brett was the founding Executive Director of GetUp, Campaign Director at Avaaz and worked in policy advocacy roles at Oxfam Australia and Amnesty International Australia. Based in both New York and near Byron Bay, Australia, Brett has a Bachelors in Arts and Law and a Masters in International Law. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Redo HipHop: Clear the Waves | Kwabena Rasuli | TEDxGary

Redo Hip Hop so exclude violence, vulgarity, self-hatred and misogyny Born in Venice, California in the Los Angeles area near the beach. Raised in Compton and Carson, California. Graduated from Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. Moved to Gary, Indiana in the early nineties! Worked at both the local utility and local university during his professional career. Has also spent time working in the Gary School system and performing independent consultant work both in the U.S. and overseas in Afrika. Been an active member of many organizations and movements, such as: National Society of Black Engineers, United Afrikan Movement, BLM Northwest Indiana-Gary and National Black Leadership Alliance. In 2013 assisted in the organization of the Clear The Airwaves Project. A project dedicated to the removal of vile, vulgar and violent music from commercial radio stations. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Reimagine Everything | Tyrell Anderson | TEDxGary

Reimagine Everything is a TEDx Gary Talk about reframing your life and circumstances and putting the reset button even in the face of rejection so that your can persevere… Tyrell Anderson is the president and founder of Decay Devils Inc. Its mission is to educate the general public about the historic and social importance of abandoned architectural structures, as well as to seek out and secure funding to restore and preserve abandoned historic structures through local communities and the world.

Anderson lives in Gary, Indiana, graduated from Purdue University Lafayette with a bachelor’s degree in Industrial Technology, and works for The U.S. Steel Corporation. He is also the President of the Gary Public Libraries board of trustees. In 2018, he was an honoree of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s inaugural 40 Under 40: People Saving Places list and was awarded the American Express Aspire Award in 2019. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Readjust and Reconsider Finances | Sharon Mallory | TEDxGary

Readjust & Reconsider your finances because everyone has 100% of what they make. It is what you with what you make that counts! Sharon Mallory is the visionary and CEO of SDM Investments, LLC a registered investment firm in Chicago, IL and Merrillville, IN. She is responsible for defining and maintaining the direction of SDM and ensuring that her client’s financial planning needs are being met at the highest level of fiduciary responsibility. Mallory served as a commanding officer in the United States Army several years prior to entering the financial industry. In 1992, she worked in corporate America as a financial advisor and remained in corporate America for 14 years before launching SDM Investments, LLC. She has an extensive background in leadership and sales. She recently authored the books, Drama, Dollars and Dreams: A Diva’s Guide to Financial Management and 77 Wealth Wisdom Tips. Her articles have appeared in Indiana Minority Business Magazine and The American Association of Individual Investors Magazine. She is also featured on the TD Ameritrade Human Finance Project. Sharon attended Purdue University in Lafayette, IN where she received her BA degree prior to pursuing advanced degrees at Chicago State University and the University of Colorado’s School of Financial Planning. She received her Chartered Mutual Fund Counselor (CMFC) designation from the University of Colorado. She holds her FINRA series 6, 63, 65 securities licenses, and life and health insurance licenses in various states in which the firm is registered. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

What’s funny? How comedians translate humor | Paul F. Tompkins | Big Think

What’s funny? How comedians translate humor
Watch the newest video from Big Think: https://bigth.ink/NewVideo
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When you’re trying to write something funny, it has to be an idea that first strikes you, personally, as funny.

The reason for this is that, then, it’s something you’re genuinely amused by. When this is so, it’s based on observation of an experience that others may relate to.

The next step, after this, is to try to translate it for others to understand. Sometimes you can’t reword it perfectly for others to appreciate because the words themselves carry different notes of meaning to you. Nevertheless, the aim is to try to keep your audience’s jargon, their palette of words, in mind.
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Paul F. Tompkins is a comedian, actor and writer. He is known for his work in television on such programs as Mr. Show with Bob and David, Real Time with Bill Maher and Best Week Ever, and he co-starred in There Will Be Blood, with Daniel Day-Lewis.

He is well known for his numerous appearances on podcasts, including his 100+ appearances on Comedy Bang! Bang! He is also the host of the Fusion Channel talk show No, You Shut Up!, The Dead Authors Podcast, the online Made Man interview series Speakeasy with Paul F. Tompkins, the Earwolf podcast SPONTANEANATION with Paul F. Tompkins, and The Pod F. Tompkast, which was ranked #1 by Rolling Stone on their list of “The 10 Best Comedy Podcasts of the Moment” in 2011.
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TRANSCRIPT:

PAUL F. TOMPKINS: The first thing you start with when you’re trying to write something funny is it has to – it really has to come to you first. I has to be an idea that you have that first makes you laugh, that strikes you as funny. And I think this is – this is always a weird thing to explain to people who are not in comedy what that is like because it’s not as if I think of a written out joke that I tell myself. It’s really – it’s a flash of an idea that strikes you as funny. It’s the same for everybody. It’s just you, something strikes you as funny it literally strikes you as funny that all of a sudden you’re amused by something. And then the job of the comedian, anyone who’s trying to express humor to other people, I always think of it as an act of translation. And there’s a language that I speak inside my head. There’s a language that we all speak. What I have to do is convert it from the language that I speak in my head to a language that everyone will understand. And the heartbreak of it is is that it’s never, ever – I’m never ever going to be able to open up my head and let you see it the way that I saw it. I’m only going to come so close. But the goal always is to get close enough. So if I can explain this concept to you I can show you why it is funny than that’s the job, you know, then mission accomplished.

But, you know, it’s weird to think about but there’s that feeling that we all get when we make ourselves laugh, you know. And making yourself laugh is not a shameful thing. It’s not an egotistical thing. Everyone does it. Everyone does it. You have an observation and it strikes you as funny. That’s just built into us, you know.

I think that the idea of what makes people laugh is the ongoing search and, you know, for me the most heartbreaking thing is there’s something that occurred to me as being hilarious that’s so funny and I can never explain it to people. I can never fully translate it to people. And that happens occasionally that I can try to reword it, I can try to set it up differently but I can never get it to be as funny to other people as it is to me. And it could be that that’s the breakdown of common experience. And that’s where our minds are all different. I think that we’re the same more than we are different and I think that the commonality of experience that we share is great and broad. And I think those are the things that always hit home the most. I think that we all enjoy silliness to varying degrees but I think everyone can enjoy a relatable thing if it is expressed in a funny way. There’s something about that connection that I think is much deeper and much richer a lot of the time. That you may laugh out loud more at a silly thing but it’s a different emotion when you’re laughing at a thing that you relate to.

Life after COVID: will our masks ever come off? | Stella Kyriakides | TEDxYouth@EEB3

NOTE FROM TED: TEDx events are independently organized by volunteers. The guidelines we give TEDx organizers are described in more detail here:http://storage.ted.com/tedx/manuals/tedx_content_guidelines.pdf

A Cypriot psychologist and politician, on December 2019, Ms. Kyriakides became the European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety. During the COVID-19 crisis, she has been leading the Commission’s work to coordinate the EU’s health response and support Member States to tackle the pandemic. She is responsible for the EU’s Vaccine Strategy in order to procure safe and effective vaccines for all EU Member States and Europe’s broader neighborhood.

She is also responsible for the establishment of a strong European Health Union and supporting Member States to strengthen healthcare systems and deliver better patient outcomes for all EU citizens. This includes leading the reinforcement of EU health agencies, putting in place a stronger framework of cooperation against health threats, setting up a Health Emergency Preparedness and Response authority, rolling out Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan to help improve cancer prevention and care, the new Pharmaceutical Strategy to ensure that Europe has enough affordable medicines to meet its needs, creating a European Health Data Space and the implementation of the new and ambitious EU4Health Programme.

Learn more about TEDxYouth@EEB3 here: https://ec.eeb3.eu/tedx
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@tedxyoutheeb3 (https://www.instagram.com/tedxyoutheeb3/) on Instagram. We’ve got a Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/TEDxYouthEEB3/) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/tedxyouthateeb3) page, too! A Cypriot psychologist and politician, on December 2019, Ms. Kyriakides became the European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety. During the COVID-19 crisis, she has been leading the Commission’s work to coordinate the EU’s health response and support Member States to tackle the pandemic. She is responsible for the EU’s Vaccine Strategy in order to procure safe and effective vaccines for all EU Member States and Europe’s broader neighborhood. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

How Workplace Learning Can Combat Climate Change | Pete Tipler | TEDxAberdeen

NOTE FROM TED: TEDx events are independently organized by volunteers. The guidelines we give TEDx organizers are described in more detail here:http://storage.ted.com/tedx/manuals/tedx_content_guidelines.pdff

Pete Tipler has a passion for learning and development, which has not only helped him in his own career, but has helped him to influence, shape and evolve the businesses he works for, including Xodus Group. Pete recognises that he was repeatedly given the freedom to learn, experiment and sometimes fail in a safe environment and surrounded by people who knew what they were doing.

If we are going to solve some of the biggest climate and energy challenges in coming years, he believes we need to do more of this, and quicker.

His talk focuses on using learning to unlock the climate change conundrum. We need to act more quickly to responsibly bring about the lasting change to our planet. Why not transform the way we harness minds for workplace learning to focus on helping the environment? This is after all what really matters. Every person entering the professional workforce for the first time spends their first year learning behavioural and analytical skills. That’s 2,000 years of learning that could be used to create meaningful impact by taking on world-saving projects, all while learning those same skills.

Pete has created a not-for-profit initiative called X Academy, which will reinvest training profits into further training, climate projects and innovations to help combat the issue of climate change.

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This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx Pete Tipler has a passion for learning and development, which has not only helped him in his own career, but has helped him to influence, shape and evolve the businesses he works for, including Xodus Group. Pete recognises that he was repeatedly given the freedom to learn, experiment and sometimes fail in a safe environment and surrounded by people who knew what they were doing. Pete has created a not-for-profit initiative called X Academy, which will reinvest training profits into further training, climate projects and innovations to help combat the issue of climate change. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Kevin J. Krizek: How COVID-19 reshaped US cities | TED

Visit http://TED.com to get our entire library of TED Talks, transcripts, translations, personalized talk recommendations and more.

The pandemic spurred an unprecedented reclamation of urban space, ushering in a seemingly bygone era of pedestrian pastimes, as cars were sidelined in favor of citizens. Highlighting examples from across the United States, environmental designer Kevin J. Krizek reflects on how temporary shifts — like transforming streets into places for dining, recreation and community — can become permanent fixtures that make for more livable and sustainable cities.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know.

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Why clear definitions are key to intelligent discussions | Donald Hoffman

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Join Big Think Edge for exclusive video lessons from top thinkers and doers: https://bigth.ink/Edge

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The best way to have an intelligent conversation with others is to ensure everyone understands the terms being used. They need to be clearly defined. If this isn’t done, people may get into false arguments over nonsense — they may be talking about very, very different things. Dogmatism is often the enemy of knowledge because it often prevents us from opening ourselves up to the possibility that we may be wrong — it’s this humility that allows us to consider different people’s perspectives, some of which may be more accurate than our own. Besides the ability to helpful discussions with others, being precise about our ideas and having well-defined terms allows us to also find out precisely where we are wrong. It’s a quick and incisive way to learn.

———————————————————————————-

DONALD HOFFMAN

Donald Hoffman is professor of cognitive science at the University of California, Irvine. His writing has appeared in Scientific American and Edge, and his work has been featured in the Atlantic, Wired, and Quanta. He resides in Irvine, California.

———————————————————————————-

TRANSCRIPT:

DONALD HOFFMAN: In science and in personal life, we are often making claims. We’re claiming either that a scientific theory is true. Let’s say evolution by natural selection. Organisms evolve and are shaped by natural selection. Or we’re making spiritual claims, you know, god exists. God loves you. Or we’re making claims, you know, about politics about Republicans or Democrats and their motives and so forth.

And whenever we’re making claims in any area of science, politics, religion, or personal life, if we really want to have an intelligent, and informative, and helpful discussion, we need to make sure that we’re using terms in a well-defined way that other people understand and share the definitions. At least, they understand our definitions.

If I’m using the word god, and someone from another religion has a very, very different notion of god, we could be arguing at odds and be unhappy with each other, and not realize that we’re talking about very, very different things. And so in science and in mathematics, it’s standard to try to define, as clearly as you can, upfront what you’re talking about.

Now in some cases you can’t. Right? And where you cannot define exactly what you’re talking about, you should highlight that and say, we’re going to do research to try to find out the right definition.

So for example, the word gene in evolutionary biology. That word was a useful term. But the biologists Francis Crick and James Watson could not define with mathematical precision what a gene was. It was an intuitive notion. It was very, very helpful in genetics but without a real precise definition.

And it’s turned out, as we’ve gone on with molecular biology, our notion of the gene has been refined and refined and refined. So that’s perfectly fine. So what we need to do is give provisional definitions or if we can’t say precisely to say the kinds of phenomena we’re trying to explain. But I would say that it’s really important to be as clear as possible about what you’re talking about, to define your terms.

Especially, I would say, in spiritual discourse, right? It’s very easy to use terms like love, god, togetherness, or whatever it might be and to assume everybody else knows what you mean by love, or by altruism, or by god, or by Brahman, or whatever. And many cases, a lot of arguments and a lot of unnecessary heated discussion could be avoided by just understanding and sharing clearly what our ideas are.

Another thing I would say about this is dogmatism is always the enemy of knowledge. Being dogmatic closes you to the possibility of being wrong. Being non-dogmatic, admitting right upfront that I’m probably wrong, that I could be wrong or that I’m probably wrong, is the most helpful thing that you could possibly do to open yourself up to learning. And that’s in all aspects of life– in science, and spirituality, in a relationship with other people. Even in our relationships, don’t assume that I know everything about my partner that I’ve been with for so many years. To be open that I could be wrong about my understanding of their world.

I think that dogmatism is the biggest problem that we have in our personal lives in our discourse with others. Letting go of dogmatism being clear about our current ideas, being as precise as we can about our current ideas, not because we’re insisting that we’re right, but we’…

For the full transcript, check out https://bigthink.com/videos/intelligent-conversations

Slowly Solving the Mystery of Turtle Origins

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The origin story of turtles is a mystery that has perplexed many for centuries, but thanks to more recent studies, we might be one step closer to figuring out their lineage.

Hosted by: Michael Aranda

SciShow is on TikTok! Check us out at https://www.tiktok.com/@scishow
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Sources:

https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-110218-024746
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/pala.12460
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264351337_The_dawn_of_chelonian_research_Turtles_between_comparative_anatomy_and_embryology_in_the_19th_century_THE_DAWN_OF_CHELONIAN_RESEARCH
https://nph.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdfdirect/10.1111/nph.15708

Images

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Turtle_fossil_cast.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Eunotosaurus_africanus_life_restoration.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Odontochelys-Paleozoological_Museum_of_China.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Proganochelys_Quenstedti.jpg
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/3d-animation-of-rotating-dna-strand-surrounded-alien-cells-4k-abstract-health-animation-hokwxmyjukamdfntu
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fossil_sea_turtle.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sea_turtle_skull.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Turtle_skeleton_cross-section,_labelled_as_infographic.svg
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/smilling-turtle-portrait-gm1176850051-328301566
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/newly-hatched-turtles-gm480513299-36591506

The Illusion of Inclusion for an Individual | Alexander Sherman | TEDxMSUDenver

Ever feel out of place? Like you don’t belong? As an autistic individual I feel this way often. But why? This talk explains exactly why, and how to overcome it. The illusion is that groups are the only ones to feel included. But what about me? Or you? Figure this out with my talk “The Illusion of Inclusion” Alexander Sherman was born in Tampa, Florida. For the past twenty years he has been trying to impact people and communities wherever he goes. The topic of his Ted Talk is related specifically to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in people, schools, and communities. When Alex was growing up it was not wholly recognized in schools and medical communities. So, he has shared as often as he can to as many people as he can about his experiences as an Autistic student and adult. Alex has spent extensive time volunteering and working with organizations handling disabilities, as well as underrepresented youth coming from diverse communities. Diversity and inclusivity are more present in the world than it has ever been before, so naturally how we talk about these things must change as well. He would like to thank everyone that has participated in this journey, all of you matter. Most of all Alex would like to thank his mother Karen Settle, none of this would have been possible without you. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

The 4 Steps That Could Solve Every Global Crisis

Check out the heroes who saved the ozone layer at https://futureoflife.org/future-of-life-award/
Lots of global problems seem intractable, but there’s a formula for success that we can follow.

LEARN MORE
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To learn more about this topic, start your googling with these keywords:
Ozone layer: A thin layer of ozone concentrated in the Earth’s stratosphere roughly 10 kilometers above that absorbs most of the sun’s ultraviolet radiation before it hits the Earth’s surface.
Ultraviolet radiation: Invisible rays of energy that come from the sun that can be harmful to humans and other lifeforms.
Chlorofluorocarbons: Also known as CFCs, these long man-made molecules used to be widely used refrigerants and solvents before it was discovered that – when exposed to ultraviolet radiation – their chlorine atoms would break off and combine with ozone molecules.
Smallpox: A virus that killed more than half a billion humans before being eradicated in 1980.
Disease Surveillance: A practice by which disease progressions are closely monitored in order to minimize the harm caused by outbreaks.

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REFERENCES
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Ochmann, Sophie, and Max Roser. “Smallpox.” Our World in Data, 2018, https://ourworldindata.org/smallpox. Data on Smallpox.
Henderson, D A. SMALLPOX – the DEATH of a DISEASE : The inside Story of Eradicating a Worldwide Killer. S.L., Prometheus, 2021, pp. 57–61.
CDC. “History of Smallpox.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 Feb. 2021, https://cdc.gov/smallpox/history/history.html.
Waxman, Olivia B. 2019. “Reagan Administration Officials at First Dismissed the Ozone Hole. Here’s What Changed.” Time. April 9, 2019. https://time.com/5564651/reagan-ozone-hole/
Velders, G. J. M., S. O. Andersen, J. S. Daniel, D. W. Fahey, and M. McFarland. 2007. “The Importance of the Montreal Protocol in Protecting Climate.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104 (12): 4814–19. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0610328104.
US Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. n.d. “Susan Solomon: Pioneering Atmospheric Scientist.” Celebrating200years.noaa.gov. Accessed July 20, 2021. https://celebrating200years.noaa.gov/historymakers/solomon/welcome.html.
Solomon, Susan. 2019. “The Discovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole.” Nature 575 (7781): 46–47. https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-019-02837-5
Pyle, John, and Neil Harris. 2013. “Joe Farman (1930–2013).” Nature 498 (7455): 435–35. https://doi.org/10.1038/498435a.
Foege, William H, and Milbank Memorial Fund. House on Fire : The Fight to Eradicate Smallpox. Berkeley, University Of California Press, 2012
Future of Life Institute. “Future of Life Award 2020: Saving 200,000,000 Lives by Eradicating Smallpox.” Future of Life Institute, Lucas Perry, 11 Dec. 2020, https://futureoflife.org/the-future-of-life-podcast/.

You could have a secret twin (but not the way you think) – Kayla Mandel Sheets

Download a free audiobook version of “The Vanishing Half“ and support TED-Ed’s nonprofit mission: https://www.audible.com/ted-ed

While searching for a kidney donor, Karen Keegan stumbled upon a mystery. After undergoing genetic testing, it turned out that some of her cells had a completely different set of genes from the others. And this second set of genes belonged to her twin sister— who had never been born. How did this happen? Kayla Mandel Sheets explores the condition known as chimerism.

Lesson by Kayla Mandel Sheets, directed by Luísa M H Copetti, Hype CG.

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The counter side of young power | Zofia Kierner | TEDxWarsaw

Is it possible to change the world at 18 years old? Yes! Zofia shows us why adult support is crucial and what adults can do today to open developmental doors for young people.
She also introduces the concept of an open table and encourages adults to open a seat at the mentorship, finance, and visibility tables for young change-makers.

Zofia Kierner is a student at the University of California, Berkeley, an award-winning social entrepreneur, education and gender equality advocate, one of the Vogue’s top social activists, finalist of #studentglobalprize and the winner of Ambassador of Polish Innovation. She founded and personally manages Girls Future Ready Foundation, an educational organization that spotlights the power of young women and runs multiple international projects. Zofia has a passion for public speaking, delivers talks at conferences, appears in the press, radio, and TV programs. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

This Is Why Women See Better Than Men

Women and men see different, this is the science of why!
The first 1,000 people to use this link will get a 1 month free trial of Skillshare: https://skl.sh/asapscience08211

Inspired by this INCREDIBLE book, PLZ BUY: https://milkweed.org/book/braiding-sweetgrass

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Written by: Gregory Brown
Edited by: Luka Šarlija

RESOURCES:
https://www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/do-color-blindness-correcting-glasses-work
https://www.iflscience.com/brain/image-can-trick-your-brain-and-make-you-see-it-color/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6120989/
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/231075053_Complementary_colours_for_a_physicist
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK11059/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562597/
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2158244016682478
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/231075053_Complementary_colours_for_a_physicist
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1080/17470215708416225
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562597/

Does our society incentivize disinformation? | Daniel Schmachtenberger

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Disinformation is rampant in human behavior, from ancient tribes hiding sources of water and gold from one another, to poker players bluffing and soccer players faking. Information is strategic.The current information ecology is controlled by large tech companies whose goals may be radically different from the goals of the individuals using the platforms.When it comes to critical issues like climate change, nuclear weapons stocks, and even foreign interference in U.S. elections, there is very little clear information, which impedes our decision making—that information scarcity is devastating when our survival as a species hangs in the balance.

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DANIEL SCHMACHTENBERGER

Daniel Schmachtenberger is a social philosopher whose central focus is civilization design: Developing new capacities for sense-making and choice-making, individually and collectively, to support conscious sustainable evolution. He shares on these topics at civilizationemerging.com.

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Neutron Stars: The Most Extreme Objects in the Universe

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We’ve traveled to lots of weird places on this show – from the interiors of black holes to the time before the big bang. But today I want to take you on a journey to what has got to be the weirdest place in the modern universe – a place where matter exists in states I bet you’ve never heard of. Today we take a journey to the center of the neutron star.

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Why Y Chromosomes Won’t Be Around Forever

We’re generally taught that chromosomes determine an animal’s sex, but it is way more nuanced than that.

Hosted by: Rose Bear Don’t Walk

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Sources:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4077654/
https://www.nature.com/scitable/definition/recombination-226/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK10008/
https://bio.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Introductory_and_General_Biology/Book%3A_Introductory_Biology_(CK-12)/02%3A_Cell_Biology/2.39%3A_Genetic_Variation
https://bio.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Introductory_and_General_Biology/Book%3A_General_Biology_(Boundless)/19%3A_The_Evolution_of_Populations/19.2%3A_Population_Genetics/19.2A%3A_Genetic_Variation
https://jmg.bmj.com/content/jmedgenet/22/3/164.full.pdf
https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/genetic-mechanisms-of-sex-determination-314/
https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/nettie-stevens-a-discoverer-of-sex-chromosomes-6580266/
https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/352001
https://embryo.asu.edu/pages/studies-spermatogenesis-1905-nettie-maria-stevens
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/31545/31545-h/31545-h.htm
https://academic.oup.com/mbe/article/29/6/1645/999408
https://academic.oup.com/gbe/article/12/6/750/5823304
https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/698198
https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rstb.2016.0456
https://www.genetics.org/content/207/2/711
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK10943/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279001/
https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article/108/1/78/2631559
https://www.nature.com/articles/nature03021
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21967422/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK9989/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1660543/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4077654/
https://academic.oup.com/icb/article/49/6/730/629874
https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/gene/sry/
https://www.genetics.org/content/207/2/711
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-58997-2
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5704219/
https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/biochemistry-genetics-and-molecular-biology/wnt4
https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/gene/wnt4/

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aristotle_Altemps_Inv8575.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nettie_Stevens.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregor_Mendel#/media/File:Gregor_Mendel_2.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ideogram_human_chromosome.svg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nettie_Stevens_microscope_(2).jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:XY_chromosomes.png
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/quail-eggs-in-the-nest-gm517752906-89663599
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/platypus-young-gm1220729124-357558396
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/cardinal-in-spruce-tree-gm1312384073-401211378
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/bees-on-honeycomb-with-bee-uterus-gm957010644-261312110
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rana_rugosa_by_OpenCage.jpg
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/fertilization-of-human-egg-cell-by-spermatozoan-gm622767176-109048913
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_mole_vole#/media/File:Ellobius_talpinus.jpg
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/dna-sequencing-the-bases-of-a-fragment-of-dna-abstract-background-skx-uxydpkgvmnshp

Escaping the Hidden Prison of Auditory Processing Disorder | Angela Loucks Alexander | TEDxTauranga

If your auditory system works like a computer, your ears are the hardware and your brain is the software. Even when the ears hear normally, errors in the software (the processing) can interfere with understanding or remembering what was heard. This is called Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) and often leaves sufferers feeling isolated and disconnected. Of the approximately 6% of the population struggling with APD, most don’t even know it’s a disorder. The good news is that with specialised audiologist help, dramatic improvement in auditory processing is possible.

Dr Angela Loucks Alexander, Audiologist, has spent fifteen years specialising in diagnosing and treating Auditory Processing Disorder (APD), a hearing difficulty with less to do with the ears and more to do with the brain. Despite significantly affecting potential and well-being, many of those affected are unaware of the condition, let alone their treatment options. Angela is the host of Between Two Ears podcast and founder of the Auditory Processing Institute, where she trains audiologists and speech-language pathologists to provide APD services. She has also created an online, searchable map to help clients find the help they need.

www.AuditoryProcessingInstitute.com
APDsupport.com
https://linktr.ee/apdsupport
http://linkedin.com/in/angelaloucks
Dr. Angela Alexander, Audiologist is the Director of Education at Auditory Processing Institute where she teaches Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists how to provide effective auditory processing services ranging from testing to treatment through online, on-demand courses.

Angela has spent the past fifteen years specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of Auditory Processing Disorder, a hearing difficulty that has less to do with the ears and more to do with the brain. She co-authored the chapter titled “Therapy and Management of Auditory Processing Disorders” in the most recent Handbook of Clinical Audiology. Her podcast, Between Two Ears has recently launched discussing and demonstrating listening and hearing disorders in ways you may have not previously considered. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

10 Extremely Valuable Lost Treasures

Whatever happened to pirate Amaro Pargo’s treasure? Or over 90 classic episodes of Doctor Who?

In this episode of The List Show, host Erin McCarthy explores some of the most interesting and valuable pieces of lost treasure. From lost pieces of media to literal pirate booty, we’ll be covering the amazing and tragic stories of valuables that seem to be gone forever.

In case you forgot, The List Show is a trivia-tastic, fact-filled show for curious people. Subscribe here for new Mental Floss episodes every Wednesday: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpZ5…

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/mental_floss
Facebook: https://facebook.com/mentalflossmagazine

My Other Car is a Time Machine: A Journey Back to Self Compassion | Mike Iskandar | TEDxNCState

What if you could travel back in time to every age of your life so far? What would you learn about who you were in your past, who you are today, and who you want to become in your future?

In the year leading up to his 40th birthday, Mike Iskandar made this vision a reality by interviewing 40 people from ages 1 to 40 in order to heal old wounds, reconnect to the best qualities and experiences of his past, and envision a new future for himself. The result was profound; an unconventional path to deeper compassion and human connection that is now the basis for a self-development program helping schools and organizations transform self doubt into self love.

In this talk, Mike shares the inspiration for his journey, key insights from his 40 interviews, and the broader impact and opportunity such a program has for those facing an epidemic of self doubt, anxiety, and depression, particularly for teens and tweens.

About the Speaker:
Mike Iskandar guides “time travelers” on an exploration of the best qualities and experiences of their past and future selves, and how those discoveries can uplift their present sense of self. Mike Iskandar is on a mission to help the world overcome the silent struggle of self-doubt, anxiety, and depression that strikes far too early in childhood and lasts far too long into adulthood. He is the founder of Time Travel Journeys, a self development program that guides participants on an exploration of the best qualities of their past and future selves, and how those qualities can uplift who they are today. Mike’s journey began in the year leading up to his 40th birthday, when he responded to some of life’s biggest questions (“Where did the time go?!” … “Who am I?” … “What legacy will I leave behind?”) by interviewing 40 people from ages 1 to 40 about what it’s like to be the age that they are. This unique journey of self discovery revealed an unconventional path to self compassion that is now helping children and adults to understand and appreciate who they were, who they are, and who they aspire to be. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Making A Math Murderer

Just think of all the questions that arise when a seemingly-healthy baby dies. Was there an illness that went undetected? Was there a rare genetic defect that couldn’t possibly have been known? Are any signs of physical trauma related to the resuscitation efforts of a fragile infant, or something more sinister? Every time a baby dies, police investigate with a host of complex questions to determine whether the death is natural and accidental, or… not. And the odds are anything but clear.

So what do we do when it happens twice to the same person? What are the odds of THAT?

A British mother named Sally Clark suffered two separate tragedies with the deaths of her infant sons. Her resulting trial for murder included expert testimony from Sir Roy Meadow, a noted expert on child abuse cases. And Meadow’s misuse of conditional probability painted Sally Clark as perpetrator rather than a victim.

Math is often theoretical, but sometimes doing it right is the difference between life and death.

*** PARTIAL LIST OF SOURCES ***

Ben-Israel, Adi. “Using Statistical Evidence in Courts: What Went Wrong in the Case of Sally Clark?” http://ben-israel.rutgers.edu/711/Sally_Clark.pdf

Dyer, Clare. “Falsely Convicted Sally Clarke Dies Suddenly.” BMJ: British Medical Journal, vol. 334, no. 7594, BMJ, 2007, pp. 602–03, http://www.jstor.org/stable/20506708.

General Medical Council v. Meadow, England and Wales Court of Appeals (Civil Division), http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2006/1390.html

Nobles, Richard, and David Schiff. “A Story of Miscarriage: Law in the Media.” Journal of Law and Society, vol. 31, no. 2, [Cardiff University, Wiley], 2004, pp. 221–44, http://www.jstor.org/stable/1410525.

Scheurer, Vincent. “Convicted on Statistics?” http://understandinguncertainty.org/node/545

Schneps, L., & Colmez, C. (2013). Math on trial: How numbers get used and abused in the courtroom. https://www.amazon.com/Math-Trial-Numbers-Abused-Courtroom/dp/0465032923

Watkins SJ. Conviction by mathematical error? Doctors and lawyers should get probability theory right. BMJ. 2000;320(7226):2-3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1117305/

Webster, Richard. “Roy Meadow and the Statistics of Cot Deaths.” http://www.richardwebster.net/cotdeaths.html

*** LINKS ***

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Hosted and Produced by Kevin Lieber
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Research and Writing by Matthew Tabor

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#education #vsauce #math

IBM: The Rise and Stagnation of a Global Icon

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Why Curveballs Are in the Eye of the Beholder

In baseball, a curveball can be pretty hard for a batter to hit. And it turns out the reason why might have more to do with the batter’s eyes than the pitcher’s arm!

Hosted by: Michael Aranda

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Sources:
Vox “Watch: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball” https://www.vox.com/2015/6/23/8833851/curveball-illusion-science
The Washington Post “The surprising science of why a curveball curves” https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2016/07/12/the-surprising-science-of-why-a-curveball-curves/
Illumin Magazine “Setting the Curve: The Magnus Effect and its Applications” https://illumin.usc.edu/setting-the-curve-the-magnus-effect-and-its-applications/
The New York Times “Baseball’s Sticky Situation” https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/12/sports/baseball/ball-doctoring-spider-tack.html
Slate “How To Throw the Goopball” https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2006/10/the-physics-of-baseball-s-most-popular-illegal-pitches.html
Shapiro et al. 2010 “Transitions between Central and Peripheral Vision Create Spatial/Temporal Distortions: A Hypothesis Concerning the Perceived Break of the Curveball” https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0013296#s2
A. Terry Bahill “The Science of Baseball: Batting, Bats, Bat-Ball Collisions, and the Flight of the Ball” https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Science_of_Baseball/t559DwAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=curveball+2015+prediction+vision&pg=PA276&printsec=frontcover
WIRED “A Curveball’s Curve? It’s All in Your Head” https://www.wired.com/2010/10/curveball-illusion/
Kwon et al. 2015 “Unifying account of visual motion and position perception” https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/early/2015/06/11/1500361112.full.pdf

Images:
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/baseball-batter-hitting-ball-from-pitch-rh3dhqbkhjx0heu0j
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:12-6_Curveball.gif
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/dominican-baseball-player-strike-out-ribqcmxrwj99aqz3x
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Magnus-anim-canette.gif
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/mlb-base-hit-for-the-home-team-sgcjnxekhjwzea3d8
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/baseball-player-throwing-a-ball-during-a-match-346593114
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/baseball-player-throwing-a-ball-during-a-match-346593116
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/passenger-airplane-landing-against-sunset-caught-by-camera-bas6xsy4vjrjquse1
https://www.storyblocks.com/video/stock/baseball-home-run-slow-motion-hwmxgnvyrjwzgaweo

Do Chairs Exist?

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Material Composition

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Earth’s mysterious red glow, explained – Zoe Pierrat

Explore the phenomenon and uses of chlorophyll fluorescence, a small amount of light emitted by plants during photosynthesis.

In 2009, a satellite circled Earth, scanning and sorting the wavelengths reflecting off the planet’s surface. Researchers noticed something baffling: an unexpected wavelength of unknown origin. They tried looking at Earth with only this wavelength, and saw the planet covered in a red hue of varying intensity. So, what was going on? Zoe Pierrat explores the science of chlorophyll fluorescence.

Lesson by Zoe Pierrat, directed by Denis Chapon, The Animation Workshop.

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Solving our organic waste & protein source with one insect | Rendria Labde | TEDxJakartaStudio

Indonesia is the world’s second largest contributor to food waste, which contradicts the fact that many Indonesians are still living under poverty and lack access to more affordable protein source. Also, the cheap and unsustainable source of protein that are used for animal feed poses a serious threat to the marine ecosystem. In this talk, Rendria Labde explores the possibility of solving two problems with one natural intervention. Rendria Labde co-founded agritech company Magalarva in 2017 after a trip to Bantar Gebang — one of the world’s largest landfills — inspired him to try to find a away to reduce waste. His solution? The Black Soldier Fly (BSF).

For many flies are just disgusting and insignificant insect that live among trash, but not to Rendria. He saw an opportunity with the BSF and their capabilities to effectively consume these waste. At his startup, Magalarva, he feeds the organic waste to the BSF larva, which breaks it down. Once fed, they are able to harvest them to convert into a wide range of products such as fertiliser, fishmeal or dried powder as an alternative source of protein for pets.

Rendria holds a degree in mechanical engineering from Universitas Indonesia. A certified permaculturist, he is also the co-founder of Kebun Kumara, an urban farm in Jakarta. He was most recently included in the Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list in 2021 for his effort with Magalarva. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

How conspiracy beliefs reveal intuitive & reflective impulses | Thea Zander-Schellenberg | TEDxBasel

Are you concerned with an implausible belief? Thea Zander-Schellenberg talks about the cognitive mechanisms of implausible beliefs in general and how conspiracy beliefs in particular manifest between the dynamic interplay of intuition and deliberation. Dr. Thea Zander-Schellenberg is intrigued by human thinking and reasoning. As a research scientist, she investigates how people form judgments and arrive at decisions. In this spirit, the dynamic interplay of intuition and reflection is one of her main research topics. She is currently leading a SNSF Ambizione research project on intuition in schizophrenia at the Department of Psychology at the University of Basel. Her academic background in psychology and cognitive neuroscience form the basis of her scientific expertise and her deep fascination for science. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

The Strange Orbit of Earth’s Second Moon (plus The Planets) – Numberphile

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Hispanic Heritage Month Livestream: America Ferrera, Germán Santillán, Xiye Bastida & More! | TED

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, TED is celebrating by streaming talks by Hispanic speakers from over the years. This special livestream features both English and Spanish language talks from actress and activist America Fererra, TED Fellow Germán Santillán, climate activist Xiye Bastida and many more!

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Introducing Vox’s new HBO show, Level Playing Field

We made a series with HBO! Level Playing Field premieres tonight at 8PM ET on HBO and HBO Max and explores stories where sports and policy intersect — from how the NCAA’s student-athlete policy influences gig work to how WNBA athletes’ activism helped shape the US Senate. New episodes every Tuesday.

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The hackable technology that worries even a legendary con man | Frank W. Abagnale

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Right now cybercrime is basically a financial crime — it’s a business of stealing people’s money or stealing their data. Data has value.We develop a lot of technology — we need to always ask the question how the new innovation can be misused and make safeguards so that it cannot be done.Because we currently don’t do these things, we have hackable vehicles, pacemakers, and laptops.

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FRANK W. ABAGNALE

Frank W. Abagnale is one of the world’s most respected authorities on the subjects of forgery, embezzlement and secure documents. Mr. Abagnale has been associated with the FBI for over four decades. He lectures extensively at the FBI Academy and for the field offices of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He is a faculty member at the National Advocacy Center (NAC) which is operated by the Department of Justice, Executive Office for United States Attorneys. More than 14,000 financial institutions, corporations and law enforcement agencies use his fraud prevention programs.

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TRANSCRIPT:

FRANK W. ABAGNALE: All the things that worry me are autonomous cars, things to hack vehicles, pacemakers, your laptop at home where you didn’t cover the camera and someone is watching everything you’re doing in your house or listening to everything you’re doing in your house. All those things give me great concern.

Right now cybercrime is basically a financial crime. Its a business of stealing money or stealing data. Data is money. However, I think its going to turn a lot blacker than that. We have the ability right now as I speak to you to shut someones pacemaker off but were limited by distance. We have to be within 35 feet of the victim. I could walk by you on the sidewalk, turn off your pacemaker, speed it up or any bodily device you have on you controlled by a chip or a computer program. We have that ability right now but again limited by distance.

We have the ability now for law enforcement to pull over a vehicle on the interstate if they can get within 35 feet of the vehicle because we know that the typical car has about 240 computer components in it. We can lock the car doors, lock the power windows, turn on the airbag, shut off the motor and take the car and pull it over. We can do that now but were limited to distance of 35 feet. So the question is five years from now will that be 35 miles, 350 miles, 3,500 miles away? Im afraid as the future comes and especially when you talk about cars that drive themselves. The ability to kidnap the person in the car and lock them in the car. The ability to just take over the car and crash the car. Those are the things that havent been answered that no one has figured out yet how they would stop that from happening. And those are the things that concern me.

We develop a lot of technology but we never go to the final step and that is the last question of the development in how would someone misuse this technology and lets make sure it cant be done. In your house you have a device you talk to and you say, “Hey, what time of day is it? Whats on TV tonight? Order me this from Amazon.” Its a voice activated device easily hacked and manipulated to reverse to hear everything you say in your house. If you have cameras in your house maybe because of dog watching, babysitting, a hacker can easily reverse the camera so they can see everything that goes on in your house and watch it. The same with your outside cameras. We develop those technologies, we want to make them inexpensive, number one, so they’re not encrypted. They don’t have a lot of technology in them. And two, where its return on investment. We want our money back right away.

And marketing is saying, “Hey, this is great! Weve got to get this out right away!” Without asking that question what if someone were to do this with it and how could we stop that now before we ever put it in the marketplace. Very little companies do that. Most of the technology out there can be hacked, can be manipulated because we dont do those things.